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Fiber

The Coming Tech Revolution - and Why America Might Miss It
Narrated by: Coleen Marlo
Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (43 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The world of fiber-optic connections reaching neighborhoods, homes, and businesses will be as different from what came before as the world after the advent of electricity. The virtually unlimited amounts of data we'll be able to send and receive through fiber-optic connections will enable a degree of virtual presence that will radically transform healthcare, education, urban administration and services, agriculture, retail sales, and offices. Yet all of those transformations will pale in comparison to the innovations and new industries that we can't imagine today.

In a fascinating account combining policy expertise with compelling on-the-ground reporting, Susan Crawford reveals how the giant corporations that control cable and Internet access in the United States use their tremendous lobbying power to tilt the playing field against competition, holding back the infrastructure improvements necessary for the country to move forward. And she reveals how cities and towns are fighting monopoly power to bring the next technological revolution to their communities.

©2018 Susan Crawford (P)2019 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

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Fiber: Outstanding Listen

Just finished listening to "Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution." I was very impressed with the depth and breath of this book. It was very compelling. I applaud her leadership. I'm wondering if there is an organization that can provide leadership in guiding individuals and community members who want to be activist for community based internet and fiber.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Great insight and comprehensive SWAT

Great insight and comprehensive perspective on the capabilities of end to end fiber optics with history and examples of how companies, institutions and communities have overcome obstacles to realize the benefits and limitless capabilities of this medium. We have work to do in the USA!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Crawford connects the dots .

Great breakdown of how the US lackadaisical approach to fiber adoption will hurt us in the long run. She points out in great detail what is holding us back( incumbents telco and cable companies), where they are bright spots and how greater fiber availability can help all sectors of the economy. This book should be required reading for every member of congress.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Brad
  • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 01-15-19

Very important

The author does an excellent job of unraveling the intricacies of communications regulation and the desperate need of Government to intervene in the Fiber future. She also makes many practical recommendations based on success in other places.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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More "puffery" than substance.

Olbviously, Ms. Crawford never bothered to do technical research on this topic. Now, if only I could return this dreck for a refund, I would be happy.

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  • Greg
  • SAN FRANCISCO, CA, United States
  • 03-24-19

Painful

Written and read by people that have no expertise in the area or technology in general.

There is a marginally interesting chapter on the production and laying of fibre but it is so dumbed down to the point of stupidity. The book desperately needed a technical editor.

More painfully, the book harps on regarding the need and lack of fibre in the USA with some limited descriptions of regulatory opposition.

I gave up half way through the book and had originally considered asking for a refund after enduring the first chapter.

Sadly, give this book a miss.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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A socialist's view on fiber optic home connections

This book is a socialist guide to home fiber optic connections, it sounds great only if you don’t have top pay for it. The great examples are in extremely dense cities (Singapore, Tokyo), small socialist Scandinavian countries, authoritarian China (with dense new construction) and a few relatively dense US cities (Chattanooga) subsidized with a government grant of 111 million ($620 per connection). It is high on social justice, but devoid of cost and pertinent information on construction. In the last chapter she finally quote’s a cost 0f $80 billion or more. That seems laughable because in her home state of CA they can’t build a slow speed train from nowhere to nowhere for that amount ($40 billion started, now $77 billion and not serving SF or SD as promised). This was a waste of 7 hours.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful