adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $3.95

Buy for $3.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

In 1947, British scholar, playwright, and novelist Dorothy Sayers stood in an Oxford hall and delivered a speech that would become a catalyst of the current classical education movement.

The Lost Tools of Learning is a flagship address presenting the tools that were given to students in the Middle Ages via the trivium, the study of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. For perhaps the first time, these trivium subjects were applied by Sayers to students' developmental stages. She also advocates the integration of subjects, and explains that training students to learn on their own is the chief goal of education.

This essay, which has influenced subsequent classical educators, is now available as an audio recording with the feel of being in the hall hearing Ms. Sayers herself. Read by native Briton Victoria Twigg, and introduced by Dr. Christopher Perrin.

©2007 Classical Academic Press (P)2017 Classical Academic Press

What listeners say about Dorothy Sayers: Lost Tools of Learning

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    186
  • 4 Stars
    23
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    143
  • 4 Stars
    33
  • 3 Stars
    11
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    161
  • 4 Stars
    20
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brief Speech Concerned with Education's devolution

A wonderfully worded speech by playwright Dorothy Sayers She was brave to reveal the lost education structure that once defined free-thinking education system seen in early American education system. She speaks out against the Prussian model, meant to turn out obedient, uncritical stock of soldiers for a militaristic and imperialistic culture. She Dives into the core Trivium method and makes mention of the natural expansions into the Quadrivium. If you're not informed about this core issue in educating critically thinking individuals, then this is a great start down such a path.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

much needed

this insightful essay ought to be required learning for everyone. entertaining and informative. highly recommended.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Classic and formative

Dorothy Sayers, herself apparently not an educator, gets education in a way that popular education talking heads and thinkers don't. And maybe they're popular for exactly that reason...they have to come up with trendy, flashy, and NEW ideas and ways to solve the problem of educating children. But the classical method is sound, and if not perfect, certainly adequate to produce sensible, thoughtful, capable citizens and thinkers.
This is such a short essay that it should be required reading by all teachers.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Not new, but still very interesting.

This is a short discourse on why the main objective of all education is self-education, or independent learning. With the accelerated growth of knowledge since the date it was first delivered, its message about lifelong learning is perhaps more relevant now than ever.

Not crazy about the hokey "re-enactment" presentation.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Pertinent for today

Dorothy Sayers critique of education is even more pertinent for today than when it was first delivered in 1947. Our young people today are sent out into a world "unarmed, in a day when armor was never more so necessary. By teaching them to read, we have left them at the mercy of the printed word...They do not know what words mean; they do not know how to ward them off or blunt their edge or fling them back; they are prey to words in their emotions instead of being the masters of them in their intellects." We would do well to heed her warnings and implement her advice.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Foundation for European Education

Herein are the elements of education for those of European descent. Dorothy Sayers describes the required tools for developing a mind capable of fending off propaganda and of self-learning.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

Specific to Classical Education

Very specific to classical education and the progression of dialect, logic and rhetoric. Not what I was looking for exactly.