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Publisher's Summary

Between the ages of twelve and twenty-four, the brain changes in important and, at times, challenging ways. In Brainstorm, the renowned psychiatrist and bestselling author of Parenting from the Inside Out, The Whole-Brain Child, and Mindsight, Daniel Siegel busts a number of commonly held myths about adolescence — for example, that it is merely a stage of “immaturity” filled with often “crazy” behavior — to reveal how it is in fact a vital time in our lives in terms of charting the course for the adults we ultimately become. According to Siegel, during adolescence we learn important skills, such as how to leave home and enter the larger world, how to connect deeply with others, and how to safely experiment and take risks, thereby creating strategies for dealing with the world’s increasingly complex problems.

Siegel presents listeners with an inside-out approach to focusing on how brain development affects our behavior and relationships. Drawing on important new research in the field of interpersonal neurobiology, he explores exciting ways in which understanding how the brain functions can improve the lives of adolescents, making their relationships more fulfilling and less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.

In this groundbreaking audiobook, Siegel offers teens and parents a road map for understanding the adolescent mind that will help families not just survive but also thrive through the “teenage years” and beyond.

©2013 Mind Your Brain, Inc.; 2011 David Rock and Daniel J. Siegel, M.D. Recorded by arrangement with Tarcher, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC (P)2013 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved. Healthy Mind Platter

Critic Reviews

“Dr. Siegel aptly characterizes the teen years as the most powerful life phase for activating courage, purpose, and creativity. With his usual personal and compassionate delivery, he illustrates how we can all become more aware, empathetic, and understanding of teenagers and ourselves. A visionary and a guide, Siegel knows that if we treat teenagers with the respect and understanding they deserve, they are more likely to live up to their greatest capacities.” (Laura S. Kastner, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, University of Washington, and author of Wise-Minded Parenting: 7 Essentials for Raising Successful Tweens + Teens)

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kalutha
  • Everett, WA United States
  • 03-28-14

Narration for kindergarteners...

This audiobook was primarily designed, apparently, for parents and teenagers to listen to together, so that both could learn about the strengths and challenges of the teenage brain. I admire Daniel Siegel's work tremendously, and the content of the book is excellent, but he sounds to me like he is reading to kindergartners. It's definitely not Mister Rogers ("Want to hear about your brain, boys and girls?") but veering too far in that direction for my tastes. I kept listening, but thought about the adolescents with whom I work, and what their reactions might be. Being talked down to is one of their number one hot-button issues, so I'll have to do some research on reactions from a few of them...

22 of 24 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

I Really Wanted This Book To Be Good, But...

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No, as with the reviews of many of Daniel Siegel's other books, the actual usable information that was given could have been given in 1 chapter. I picked this book to learn about the teenage brain, not Dr. Siegel's own brand of Mindsight Meditation. Not that I'm against meditation, but his version is very simplistic and can't imagine the teenagers that I'm around giving it much respect as it lacks any substance.

What aspect of Daniel J. Siegel’s performance would you have changed?

Performance wasn't horrible, just repetitive nature of the whole work was unnecessary.

Do you think Brainstorm needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

No.

Any additional comments?

There are many things that he says that i agree with, one of the most important is the fact that teenagers (both male & female) needs some sort of rites of passage into adulthood. Which unfortunately, they are not getting in our modern culture.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

1 hour of content crammed into 10

Look the book was interesting. Just not 10 hours at 1.5 speed interesting. Very repetitive. Try the abridged version maybe.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

I'll have to get the print edition

While I find the subject fascinating, the reading was tortuous to listen to. Subject material best read in print anyway.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Where's the beef?

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

If you have read any of Daniel Siegel's other books then you probably have the gist of this book. I was hoping for a lot more information on the latest research on the teenage brain, instead it was filled with the same information from Mindsight, but with a few new stories.

If you’ve listened to books by Daniel J. Siegel before, how does this one compare?

I really enjoyed Mindsight much more than this book. If I had not read Mindsight, I might have enjoyed this book a little more.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Daniel J. Siegel?

Yes! I don't know why Daniel continues to read his own books. His voice is not at all pleasing to the ears and for an auditory type such as myself, it is distracting.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Laugh!

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Fluffy and not very grounded in science

My expectation was that this would be a book that would discuss scientific principles about the teenage brain. Instead a found a fluffy, meandering, book which only directly connected to the adolescent brain about 25% of the time. A lot of the book felt like an advertisement for other books he had written about the brain and psychology, and this was his attempt to sell more books by writing a version of his other books focused on adolescence. There were some snippets of interesting information in the book, but unfortunately the author did not consistently support his claims by describing the studies that validated each particular claim. The mindsight practices seemed the most fluffy and disconnected from science.

The author was also quite disorganized and overly verbose. He would explain the same idea multiple times in multiple ways, leave that idea for a new topic, and circle back to the same topic after a few paragraphs. I found his writing and ideas hard to follow because of this.

I do not recommend this book if you want to learn about the teenage brain. Find a book actually based in science and one that gets to the point and explains ideas clearly and directly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Just OK

They had a couple good insights. But overall it is a long book and it took me a long time to read it and get through it because it was so dry and boring. With not much really insightful ha ha is about the teenage brain that I didn't know. From being a teenager myself.

One of my other friends who has three teenagers recommended the book and she loved it. So go at your own risk

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Informative for teens and those who love them.

Very helpful information, lots of application. I will use my hard copy to reference back. It is not a “story” so that isn’t applicable. Well read and engaging.

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  • js
  • 10-18-17

Profoundly Enlightening

If you want to understand yourself, your teen and human nature, get this book for an eye opening perspective. Perfect blend of neuroscience and skills to problem solve real life issues and create connection

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Hard to follow via audio

Great author with lots of valuable research that he shares. However, it's really hard to follow with audio format. Probably better to get in print!