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Publisher's Summary

Beautiful, tender, haunting, and full of excitement, this is the memoir of famed author, explorer, Glacier Park guide, trader, and historian of the Blackfoot Indians, James Willard Schultz. With the Blackfoot woman, whom he deeply loved, from 1880 to 1903, Schultz lived the life of a Blackfoot Indian with Nat-ah-ki and her people. During this time, he began writing for magazines, at times running a trading post, and working as a guide in the West.

He met historian, writer, and naturalist George Bird Grinnell, who encouraged him to write this heartfelt and important memoir. As an ethnography of a people and a time it is invaluable.

Though he would marry again, Schultz eventually went back to live near the Native peoples he'd come to love and is buried in the traditional ground of Nat-ah-ki's people. You won't read another memoir like it.

Every memoir of the American West provides us with another view of the migration that changed the country forever.

Public Domain (P)2017 Big Byte Books

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  • Anonymous User
  • 01-25-18

exceptional book

This is more than a beautifully written account of a buffalo trader's life on the northern plains and adjacent Rockies in Montana and Canada in the post Civil War period-when things changed utterly for the Blackfeet and other Indian tribes, for the whites, and for the buffalo and other wildlife. Shultz gives us a fascinating and sympathetic view of Indian life and culture-things that he embraced as young man-and not all of it peaceful. His account seems genuine and self effacing.

The Indian vignettes and stories that he transcribes for us I found haunting in their beauty and primevalness and humanity. Finally, as noted by others, the description and celebration of his Indian wife and the strength of their marriage must be of universal appeal.

This is a great book. Full of adventure, history, lore, and insight.

Hunt's narration is exceptionally good.