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Scientific American

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  • Scientific American, February 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 35 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
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    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

  • Scientific American, April 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, April 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 27 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Story
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    In this issue: "A Rare Success against Alzheimer's": A gold-standard clinical trial provides evidence that diet, exercise and an active social life can help prevent cognitive decline. "How to Swallow a Sun": New techniques reveal how supermassive black holes shred entire stars. "Transformers": By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. "Evolution at the Limits": Studies of fishes that inhabit toxic sulfide springs reveal mechanisms of natural selection.

  • New Insights About Leadership: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    New Insights About Leadership: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 54 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    This edition includes six fascinating articles. You'll learn the secrets of effective leadership and hear how language influences our choices - from foods we eat to the laws we support. Also, discover how experts are finding out how acts of violence in schools can be predicted. Then, find out how the brain balances social concerns with economic decisions. Next, learn about the two to three percent of the population that can't recognize faces. Finally, hear why students are dropping out of college.

  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (83)
    Performance
    (30)
    Story
    (31)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
  • March 2017 | Scientific American

    March 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 15 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Story
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    In this issue: "Near-Light-Speed Mission to Alpha Centauri": A billionaire-funded plan aims to send a probe to another star. "Cancer Killers": Some advanced cancers can now be successfully treated by synthetic immune cells that are more powerful and longer-lasting than any found in the body. "Brain Trust": Poverty may affect the size, shape and functioning of a young child's brain. Would a cash stipend to parents help prevent harm? "Am I Human?": Researchers need new ways to distinguish artificial intelligence from the natural kind.

  • Why We Kiss: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    Why We Kiss: Scientific American Mind

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 28 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    You'll hear how research is revealing a hidden complexity to the simple act of kissing.You'll find out how our perception of time varies by situation.You'll learn how, in the past three generations, increasing numbers of Americans have been prescribed antidepressants - and no other mental health care. You'll discover how specific genes are being found to contribute to human personality traits, like anxiety, curiosity, and impulsive violence. And you'll learn about therapy for postpartum depression, which weakens the developing bonds between mother and child.

    Douglas says: "Interesting"
  • Scientific American, January 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 7 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    (1)
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    (1)

    In this issue: "Lab-Built Brains": Scientists copy nature's most complex organ in the hope of solving the mysteries of brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's. "Tangled Up in Spacetime": The collaborative project "It from Qubit" is investigating whether space and time sprang from the quantum entanglement of tiny bits of information. "Heart Therapy": Harnessing the organ's own healing properties may help prevent heart attacks and lessen the painful effects of severely narrowed coronary arteries.

  • The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

    Horace says: "Good"
  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (149)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
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    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Hammy says: "Direct and to the point"
  • Seeking the Connections: Alcoholism and Our Genes: Scientific American | John I. Nurnberger,Laura Jean Bierut,Scientific American

    Seeking the Connections: Alcoholism and Our Genes: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (27 mins)
    • By John I. Nurnberger, Laura Jean Bierut, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
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    Story
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    Identifying genetic influences on vulnerability to alcohol addiction can lead to more targeted treatments and help those at risk to make informed choices about their lives. Learn more in this article, "Seeking the Connections: Alcoholism and Our Genes", from the April 2007 edition of Scientific American.

  • Scientific American, August 2015 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, August 2015

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 49 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    In this issue: "How Homo sapiens Became the Ultimate Invasive Species": Many human species have inhabited Earth. But ours is the only one that colonized the entire planet. A new hypothesis explains why. "In Search of Alien Jupiters": Two rival teams of astronomers are racing to capture unprecedented images of giant planets around other stars. What they find could change the future of planet hunting. "Hidden Hearing Loss from Everyday Noise": Jackhammers, concerts and other common noisemakers may cause irreparable damage to our ears in unexpected ways. "Researchers Find That Frequent Tests Can Boost Learning": Too often school assessments heighten anxiety and hinder learning. New research shows how to reverse the trend.

  • Criminal Mind: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Criminal Mind: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles, on topics such as why some people hear voices, what causes migraine headaches, why only humans cry, the possible uses of medicine for mental fatigue, and increased usage of brain scans.

    Douglas says: "Best of this series so far..."
  • Scientific American, March 2016 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, March 2016

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 32 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Mystery Human": An astonishing trove of fossils has scientists, and the media, in a tizzy over our origins. "The Puzzle of Dark Energy": Why is the expansion of the universe accelerating? After two decades of study, the answer is as mysterious as ever, but the questions have become clearer. "Brain Drain": An internal plumbing system rids the brain of toxic wastes. Sleep is when this cleanup ritual occurs. "Syria's Climate Refugees": Farmers who have escaped the embattled nation explain how drought and government abuse have driven social violence.

  • How to Build a Time Machine: Scientific American | Paul Davies,Scientific American

    How to Build a Time Machine: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (14 mins)
    • By Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Story
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    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    Jeanne says: "Very entertaining"
  • The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 44 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (34)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

  • A Solar Grand Plan: Scientific American | Ken Zweibel,James Mason,Vasilis Fthenakis,Scientific American

    A Solar Grand Plan: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (25 mins)
    • By Ken Zweibel, James Mason, Vasilis Fthenakis, and others
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (17)

    There is an ambitious scheme in the works that would enable solar power to end U.S. dependence on foreign oil - as well as slash greenhouse gas emissions . Learn more in this article, "A Solar Grand Plan", from the January 2008 edition of Scientific American.

  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

  • Scientific American, September 2015 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, September 2015

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 35 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    In this issue: "How Einstein Reinvented Reality": Albert Einstein created his most famous theory amid personal strife, political tension and a scientific rivalry that almost cost him the glory of his discovery. "Cleaning Up After Einstein": A new generation of physicists hope to succeed where Einstein failed. "A Brief History of Time Travel": We already have the means to skip ahead in time, but going backward is a different wormhole. "In the Cosmos": Einstein's assertion that God does not play dice with the universe has been misinterpreted.

  • Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Secret Lives of Stars: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (53)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (18)

    We track these cosmic phenomena through their births, lives, and fiery deaths. The first article tells us about the appearance of the very first stars in the universe. Then, we will learn about the early days in the life of a star, as we track it's progression from dust to giant flaming ball of gas. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, scientists have discovered that stars can, and often do, collide with each other.

    Barry J. Marshall says: "Fantastic Cosmic Stuff Well Explained"
  • Lies: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Lies: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (47)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. The cover story, "Natural Born Liars", examines why we lie and why we're so good at it. Also in this issue: why innocent people confess to crimes they didn't commit; an in-depth examination of what dreams are and why we have them; the very real therapeutic uses for hypnosis; how to improve your powers of recall; and is mental stress increasing your chances of a heart attack?

    Kenneth says: "Disturbing Feature Article"
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