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Scientific American

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  • August 2017 | Scientific American

    August 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 47 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

  • July 2017 | Scientific American

    July 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 24 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

  • Scientific American, February 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 35 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

  • The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 44 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

  • Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 45 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

  • Scientific American, June 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, June 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

  • Lies: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Lies: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
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    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. The cover story, "Natural Born Liars", examines why we lie and why we're so good at it. Also in this issue: why innocent people confess to crimes they didn't commit; an in-depth examination of what dreams are and why we have them; the very real therapeutic uses for hypnosis; how to improve your powers of recall; and is mental stress increasing your chances of a heart attack?

  • Scientific American, May 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, May 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 37 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "The New Origins of Technology": 3.3-million-year-old artifacts from Kenya upend the classic story of when and how humans became innovators. "Strange News from Another Star": Alien technology is probably not causing Boyajian's star to dim mysteriously. But alternative explanations are hard to come by. "Missing Links": Loss of some DNA during evolution may have helped create big brains and our male-female relationships. "Schizophrenia's Unyielding Mysteries": Gene studies were supposed to reveal the disorder's roots. That didn't happen. Now scientists are broadening the search.

  • The Body Speaks: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Body Speaks: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. You will hear about exciting new advances in the early detection of autism, how people can be trained to recover their lost sense of smell, the special language skills that set humans apart from their fellow animals, and how the body speaks.

  • March 2017 | Scientific American

    March 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 15 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "Near-Light-Speed Mission to Alpha Centauri": A billionaire-funded plan aims to send a probe to another star. "Cancer Killers": Some advanced cancers can now be successfully treated by synthetic immune cells that are more powerful and longer-lasting than any found in the body. "Brain Trust": Poverty may affect the size, shape and functioning of a young child's brain. Would a cash stipend to parents help prevent harm? "Am I Human?": Researchers need new ways to distinguish artificial intelligence from the natural kind.

  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
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    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

  • Burnout: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Burnout: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 15 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
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    This issue of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles. In the cover story, "Burned Out," you'll find out that if you're feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your job, you're definitely not alone. You'll also hear about new research that finds older workers are not necessarily slower than younger workers, and they often make fewer errors; you'll go inside the extraordinary memory of Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for Rain Man; and more.

  • Scientific American, December 2016 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, December 2016

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 56 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "2016 World Changing Ideas": 10 big advances with the potential to solve problems and improve life for all of us. "Solar System Smashup": Our neighborhood of planets was not created slowly, as scientists once thought, but in a speedy blur of high-energy crashes, destruction and rebuilding. "HIV's Achilles Heel": Investigators hope that a three-part protein that mimics a key part of HIV particularly well could lead to a long-awaited vaccine.

  • Scientific American, April 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, April 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 27 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "A Rare Success against Alzheimer's": A gold-standard clinical trial provides evidence that diet, exercise and an active social life can help prevent cognitive decline. "How to Swallow a Sun": New techniques reveal how supermassive black holes shred entire stars. "Transformers": By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. "Evolution at the Limits": Studies of fishes that inhabit toxic sulfide springs reveal mechanisms of natural selection.

  • Scientific American, April 2016 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, April 2016

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 36 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
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    In this issue: "Tales of a Stone Age Neuroscientist": By honing ax-making skills while scanning their own brains, researchers are studying how cognition evolved. "The Neutron Enigma": Two precision experiments disagree on how long neutrons live before decaying. "The Cancer Defense": Enhancing the body's own immune system is leading to promising results in the battle against malignancy. "Machine Life": Synthetic biologists are close to putting living cells to work diagnosing human diseases and repairing environmental damage.

  • The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Teen Brain: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 30 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
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    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

  • Scientific American, January 2017 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 7 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    In this issue: "Lab-Built Brains": Scientists copy nature's most complex organ in the hope of solving the mysteries of brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's. "Tangled Up in Spacetime": The collaborative project "It from Qubit" is investigating whether space and time sprang from the quantum entanglement of tiny bits of information. "Heart Therapy": Harnessing the organ's own healing properties may help prevent heart attacks and lessen the painful effects of severely narrowed coronary arteries.

  • Why Migraines Strike: Scientific American | David W. Dodick,J. Jay Gargus,Scientific American

    Why Migraines Strike: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (23 mins)
    • By David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

  • Scientific American, December 2015 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, December 2015

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 23 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    In this issue: "World Changing Ideas 2015": Eye control, bacterial kill switches, deep learning, slow-motion chemistry, and other disruptive advances. "Telescope Wars": Bitter rivalries among three teams of scientists have slowed progress in extremely large telescopes, the best hope of ground-based astronomy. "What Killed the Dinosaurs": The asteroid strike was bad. The timing was worse. "Genomics for the People": A clinic that treats Amish and Mennonite children show the promise of genomics for preventing disease.

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