The Right Form of War

5 books in series
4 out of 5 stars 2 ratings

Horsemen from the Steppe Publisher's Summary

The Eurasian steppes have been described as “a great far-reaching solitude”, but it has been the home of untold numbers of people for millennia. From the forested margins of Poland to the frozen deserts of Mongolia, from the scorching sands of Persia to the numbing wastes of Siberia, the horsemen of the steppes periodically overrode Europe for 900 years, conquered China, and spread their culture to India and the Middle East. These nomads formed themselves into moving empires, which for a few years dominated the surrounding trembling nations, and then vanished and melted away, seemingly leaving little trace of their existence other than a record of destruction. Such were the monarchies of the Huns, Tartars, and Avars; the Scythians, Alans, and Sarmatians; and the Seljuks, Parthians, and Mongols. 

The horsemen of the steppes are best known for three characteristics. Their lives centered on their horses; they moved endlessly with their herds and families; and they were fierce and merciless warriors who used their mobility and powerful bows and arrows to threaten the so-called civilized world. The horsemen of the steppes are best known for three characteristics. Their lives centered on their horses; they moved endlessly with their herds and families; and they were fierce and merciless warriors who used their mobility and powerful bows and arrows to threaten the so-called civilized world. Until recently, the technological and cultural advances made by these nomadic peoples have been ignored, misrepresented, or even denigrated. In fact, other than glory, they left little or nothing of their material culture behind them.

©2017 James M. Volo (P)2020 James M. Volo
Show more Show less
You're getting a free audiobook.

You're getting a free audiobook.

$14.95 per month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.