Showing results by narrator "Sal Giangrasso"

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    • The 9/11 Commission Report

    • Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks
    • By: National Commission on Terrorist Attacks
    • Narrated by: Ken Borgers, Sal Giangrasso, Charlton Griffin, and others
    • Length: 20 hrs and 26 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 504
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 197
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 190

    The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9-11 Commission, was created by congressional legislation and the signature of President George W. Bush in late 2002. This independent, bipartisan commission had the task of producing a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the attack, including preparedness and immediate response, and providing recommendations designed to guard against future attacks.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Absolutely Outstanding Historical Document

    • By Louie on 08-02-04

    Regular price: $4.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 161
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 91
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 88

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Direct and to the point

    • By Hammy on 09-09-08

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan

    • Scientific American
    • By: Sushil K. Atreya, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    The presence of methane in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan might mean there is unusual geologic activity going on. It might also be an indicator of life. Learn more in this article, "The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan", from the May 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Actually 24 minutes long

    • By Joel on 04-10-10

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 6

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Seeking the Connections

    • Alcoholism and Our Genes: Scientific American
    • By: John I. Nurnberger, Laura Jean Bierut, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 27 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 9
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 2

    Identifying genetic influences on vulnerability to alcohol addiction can lead to more targeted treatments and help those at risk to make informed choices about their lives. Learn more in this article, "Seeking the Connections: Alcoholism and Our Genes", from the April 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American

    • A Robot in Every Home
    • By: Bill Gates
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 28
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 7

    From the pages of Scientific American, this is the January 2007 cover story "A Robot in Every Home" by Bill Gates. Gates is the co-founder and chairman of Microsoft. In this article, the leader of the PC revolution predicts that the next hot field will be robotics.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Diesels Come Clean

    • Scientific American
    • By: Steven Ashley, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 6

    Energy-efficient diesel engines are nearly as green as hybrids, thanks to improved technology, exhaust scrubbers, and a new fuel. This article from the March 2007 edition of Scientific American explains.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Restoring America's Big Wild Animals

    • Scientific American
    • By: C. Josh Donlan, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 18 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    A few years ago, conservation biologists met to ponder a bold plan: the reintroduction of large, extinct animals to North America. Learn where that landmark project is now with this article, "Restoring America's Big Wild Animals", from the June 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • so good

    • By Michelle Cooper on 03-29-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes

    • Scientific American
    • By: Kevin E. Trenberth, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 17 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    Evidence is mounting that global warming enhances a cyclone's damaging winds and flooding rains. Learn more in this article, "Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes", from the July 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • A Digital Life

    • Scientific American
    • By: Gordon Bell, Jim Gemmell, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 30
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 7

    New systems may allow people to record all that has touched their lives, thereby creating a collection of personal digital archives, as this article from the March 2007 edition of Scientific American explains.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, June 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story, "A Simpler Origin for Life", shows how energy driven networks of small molecules may be more likely first steps for life than the commonly held idea of the sudden emergence of large, self-replicating molecules such as RNA. Next, "Lifting the Fog around Anesthesia", which explains why current anesthetics are so potent and sometimes dangerous and how they will lead to a new generation of safer targeted drugs. We'll also hear about "Restoring America's Big Wild Animals".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, "The Promise of Plasmonics", a new technology squeezes electromagnetic waves into miniscule structures. It may yield super-fast computer chips, ultra-sensitive molecular detectors and perhaps even invisibility cloaks. Next, "Gassing up with Hydrogen". Researchers are exploring ways for fuel-cell vehicles to hold the hydrogen they need for long-distance travel. We'll also hear about a cure for rabies, and the survival of a Wisconsin teenager who contracted rabies.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American

    • Digital TV at Last?
    • By: Michael Antonoff, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 1

    TV broadcasting as we know it is set to end on Feb. 17, 2009. But as this article from the Feb. 2007 edition of Scientific American explains, its legacy could make the transition to digital TV anything but smooth.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Scientific American, February 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan, could the methane in the atmosphere of Mars and Titan be caused by unusual geologic activity or life? Next, Chromosomal Chaos and Cancer. Current wisdom on the role of genes in malignancy may not explain some of the features of cancer, but stepping back to look at the bigger picture inside cells reveals a view that just might. We'll also hear about Preventing Blackouts.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, the cover story "A Robot in Every Home" in which Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates predicts that intelligent mobile devices will soon be everywhere. Next, we'll delve into "What is a Planet?", discussing the controversial new official definition which banished Pluto. We'll also hear about the "Evolution of Cancer"...followed by "Better Ways to Target Pain". Finally, we'll explore what it will take for ethanol to pay off as an alternative to gasoline.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, March 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, the cover story, Predicting Disease: how antibodies could foretell the future of your health. Next, Diesels Come Clean: thanks to improved engines, exhaust scrubbers, and a new fuel, energy efficient diesels are nearly as green as hybrids. We'll also hear about A Digital Life: new systems may allow people to record all that has touched their lives, creating personal digital archives. Finally, we'll explore the Mapping of the Cancer Genome: crossing the complex landscape of human malignancies.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, July 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This edition includes four articles: First, the cover story: "The Memory Code", about learning to read minds by understanding how brains store experiences. Then, the articles "Warmer Water, Super Hurricanes", "A Malignant Flame", and "An Earth Without People".

    Regular price: $6.95