Showing results by author "Laura Sanders"

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    • Misguided Math

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 16 mins
    • Unabridged
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    From within the dark confines of the skull, the brain builds its own version of reality. By weaving together expectations and information gleaned from the senses, the brain creates a story about the outside world. For most of us, the brain is a skilled storyteller, but to spin a sensible yarn, it has to fill in some details itself.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Brain Waves Could Guide Anesthesia

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Signals in the brain can hint at whether a person undergoing anesthesia will slip under easily or fight the drug, a new study suggests. The results bring scientists closer to being able to tailor doses of the drugs for specific patients.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Microbes and the Mind

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 15 mins
    • Unabridged
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    The bacteria in our guts may help decide who gets anxiety and depression. "Microbes and the Mind" is from the April 2, 2016 issue of Science News.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Age Affects Brain's Response to Anesthesia

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Anesthesia elicits different patterns of brain waves in the very young and very old, scientists have found. Understanding these distinctions may ultimately lead to brain monitors that could make surgery safer for these vulnerable patient populations. These findings are groundbreaking, says neuroanesthesiologist Stacie Deiner of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. The studies explain why brain monitors — typically geared for adults and currently used by some clinicians during surgery — may not work well for the young and the elderly, she says.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Caffeine Resets Body's Clock

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    After-dinner coffee induces 40-minute time delay.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Parkinson’s May Begin in the Gut

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In mice, proteins linked to the disease moved up to the brain.

    "Parkinson’s May Begin in the Gut" is from the December 10, 2016 issue of Science News.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Schizophrenia Tied to Synapse Pruning

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    From the tangled web of schizophrenia biology, scientists have pulled out one tantalizing thread. Variants of a protein that helps snip connections between nerve cells in the brain may contribute to the disorder, scientists report.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Zipping to Mars Could Badly Zap Brain Nerve Cells

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Particle blasts similar to cosmic radiation caused memory, learning woes in mice.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • How Ketamine Really Fights Depression

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Ketamine, a drug that has shown promise in quickly easing depression in people, doesn’t actually do the job itself. Instead, depression relief comes from one of the drug’s breakdown products, a study in mice suggests. The results identify a potential depression-fighting drug that works quickly but without ketamine’s serious side effects or potential for abuse.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • "No Pain" Gene Discovered

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Mutations in a previously unscrutinized gene can leave people dangerously indifferent to harm.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Alzheimer's Spares Brain's Music Regions

    • By: Laura Sanders 
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Parts of the brain that respond to music seem to withstand the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Pregnancy Hormone Could Keep Multiple Sclerosis at Bay

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Women taking a form of estrogen had fewer relapses.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Children with Autism Excel at Motion Detection Test

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 min
    • Unabridged
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    On a test of visual perception, children with autism perceive moving dots with more clarity than children without the disorder. The results, published in the May 6 Journal of Neuroscience, reveal a way in which children with autism see the world differently.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Alzheimer's Culprit May Fight Germs

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    A notorious Alzheimer’s disease villain may also be a germ-busting superhero. Amyloid-beta gums up the brains of people with Alzheimer’s but also takes out brain invaders, scientists report. As strong as steel, tough strands of A-beta protein imprison pathogens that threaten the body and brain, experiments in mice and worms show. Those results raise the possibility that A-beta plays a role in the immune system and its accumulation in Alzheimer’s might be prompted by infection.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • New View of Mouse Brain Provides Up-close Look at Nerve Cells' Habitat

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
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    A tiny speck of mouse brain hosts a microscopic wonderland, a new study reveals. By characterizing the dense, complex habitat of brain cells down to nanometers, scientists have uncovered clues about how the brain wires itself. Among the early revelations: Nearby brain cells don't always form connections.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Pain Produces Memory Gain

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Pain can sear memories into the brain, a new study finds. A year after viewing a picture of a random, neutral object, people remembered it better if they had been feeling painful heat when they first saw it.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Test Tells Viruses from Bacteria

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Coughs, fevers and green mucus can accompany an infection, but most of the time, doctors can only guess whether the culprit is bacterial or viral. A new study points out a way to identify the perp.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Blood-Brain Barrier Jiggled Loose to Deliver Medicine

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 min
    • Unabridged
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    In its job protecting the brain from would-be invaders, the blood-brain barrier also blocks medicines from reaching the brain. But on November 5, ultrasound zaps shook loose that tight barrier in a woman who has a brain tumor, potentially granting entry to a chemotherapy drug. The technique, which relies on tiny bubbles set jiggling by ultrasound beams, has shown promise in animal models.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Autism Tied to Aberrant Sense of Touch

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Most people think that autism is a disorder of the brain. But the skin may play a role, too, a new study suggests. Nerve cells in the skin are abnormal in mice with mutations in autism-related genes, leading to altered touch perception, scientists report. This trouble sensing touch may influence the developing brain in a way that leads to social deficits and anxiety later in life.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Synapses Lost in Early Alzheimer's

    • By: Laura Sanders
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, an overzealous set of proteins and cells begins to chew away at the brain’s nerve cell connections, a study in mice suggests.

    Regular price: $1.95

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