Showing results by author "Kimberly Stephens"

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    • What Prodigies Could Teach Us about Autism

    • By: Kimberly Stephens, Joanne Ruthsatz
    • Narrated by: Fleet Cooper
    • Length: 7 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
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    "What Prodigies Could Teach Us about Autism" is from the Health section of The New York Times. It was written by Kimberly Stephens and Joanne Ruthsatz and narrated by Fleet Cooper.

    Regular price: $0.95

    • The Prodigy's Cousin

    • The Family Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Talent
    • By: Joanne Ruthsatz, Kimberly Stephens
    • Narrated by: Christina Moore
    • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 8

    We all know the autistic genius stereotypes. The absentminded professor with untied shoelaces. The geeky Silicon Valley programmer who writes bulletproof code but can't get a date. But there is another set of (tiny) geniuses whom you would never add to those ranks - child prodigies. We mostly know them as the chatty and charming tykes who liven up day­time TV with violin solos and engaging banter. These kids aren't autistic, and there has never been any kind of scientific connection between autism and prodigy. Until now.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Very interesting and informative

    • By Jessica on 01-05-17

    Regular price: $24.49

    • Children's Story Time: 'Alexandria of Parusia' and Four Short Adventurous Stories of Alexa Jade Appleton in

    • By: Kimberly Stephens
    • Narrated by: Nina S. Litvinoff
    • Length: 1 hr and 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
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      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    Alexandria was a beautiful princess with long flowing brown locks of hair and chestnut- shaped blue eyes. Her father, the King of Parusia, was a jolly and happy man that was in good spirits most of the time. In fact, his laugh was heard by both the staff of palace workers and the peasants that lived in the surrounding village. It was understood by all the inhabitants of the land that the king was always happy until he ever received word that someone in his kingdom had not told the truth.

    Regular price: $6.95