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Publisher's Summary

When Peace Corps volunteer Michael Killigan goes missing in West Africa, his father Randall and his best friend Boone Westfall begin separate quests to find him. Randall, a bankruptcy lawyer, is the warlord of his world, a shark in a fishbowl, exercising power with mad, relentless, hilarious glee; Boone, an American innocent abroad, journeys to the African bush, protected by the twin charms of the passport and the almighty dollar. In seeking Michael, both men find much more than they bargain for.
©1995 Richard Dooling (P)2010 Random House

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this is why you need editors

This had the potential to be a truly, exceptionally great book. All it needed was an editor. There are passages of real brilliance, thought provoking, evocative, laugh out loud hilarious. And then there are passages and descriptions that drone on and on repetitively. The book needed to be 10% shorter, tightened up. Not sure why this did not happen.
Also, it always feels mean to criticize the narrator, but this narration was just absolutely awful. The various African dialects and creole were conveyed as though some white person who had never been out of their own country, were trying to be funny by imitating what they think Africans sound like. But not even the plain English was OK. The narrator mispronounced words and even mis-read entire sentences so that their meaning was obscured (like those books about grammar, where the placement of a comma can completely alter the meaning).
But, on the whole, a fascinating premise, very interesting insights into tribal life and traditional belief systems, plus some intriguing analogies to our own Western beliefs about reality...

3 people found this helpful