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Publisher's Summary

This debut collection is a complicated love letter to Washington, DC, and to those who call it home: a TSA agent who's never flown, a girl braving new worlds to play piano, and a teacher caught up in a mayoral race. These characters navigate life's "training school" - with lessons on gentrification and respectability - and fight to create their own sense of space and self.

A Literary Hub pick of the ultimate books for fall.

©2018 Camille Acker (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about Training School for Negro Girls

Average Customer Ratings
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  • 4 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A thoughtful walk down memory lane

It is refreshing and filed in some of the blanks of my childhood visits to Washington, DC. I understood the mind sets and the positions and the views of all the characters. I live the experience of a interracial marriage wanting to live in an all black community. My daughter living between two worlds of a Black and Hispanic high school and being a ballerina in a predominately white ballet school. This book speaks to and reveals every black woman and man that desires to do well and succeed and still keep their black roots. Enjoy!

4 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Love letter to Black Washington!!!!

This was a beautifully written love letter to the Illustrious history and culture of Black Washingtonians. As a fifth generation Washington native I felt deeply connected to the layers and complexities of our narratives that Camille so beautifully showcased in her stories. Thank you so much for this masterpiece and I eagerly await your next book!!!

4 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars

interesting

it was less a schooling, more of the complex dynamics sistahs find themselves, create for themselves, and are squished into. i do wish there was morals to each story conclusion or the lesson learned here was.... but still beautifully written.

3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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You know someone from each story

While this book was of great short stories.Each story I could relate to,because in many of these stories I had experienced it, or knew of someone who had. I have never lived in DC ; but these stories gave me a great feel of those who had.

2 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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very familiar

A compilation of short stories about Black girls being education in the DMV area and stereotypes. Girls growing up in single parent households, two parents households, interracial relationships and so much more. Girls wanting to know if they made their father proud or mattered while their moms went above and beyond and did any and everything for them. Men cheating on their wives and abandoning their familes. It wasn't nothing I never heard off, quite familiar. #Book46of2020 #bookworm #whatsnext

1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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A BLACK GIRL/WOMAN MUST READ

It's was myself, my family, my wife, daughter, sister, mother spread across several pages. Awesome!

1 person found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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BLAH

The short stories in this collection were hit or miss. Although I grew up in DC, only a few captivated me and brought back memories; the rest of the stories didn’t seem to have substance or just seemed like unnecessary ramblings. I had high expectations for this collection and they were not met.

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beautifully read

I really enjoyed the story.
It was hard to keep track of the time line in some areas, but it was eye opening and so true and needed.
I would recommend this autio book for young girls.
B+

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Insightful

The stories said a lot while leaving plenty of room for thd reader to draw his(her) own conclusions.
Enjoyed it.

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It’s just ok

As much as I wanted to like it I was often confused, because the book jumped character’s too often and too soon.