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The Wolfen

Narrated by: Robert Fass
Length: 8 hrs and 42 mins
4 out of 5 stars (130 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In the dark, they are watching...

They are waiting for you.

No one has ever lived to tell the horrifying truth about them. Yet even now the Wolfen are gathered in the night-dark alleys ... unseen, poised ... ready to destroy their helpless human prey. Only one man and one woman, trained cops, willing to risk their lives, stand in the way.

©1978 Walker & Collier (P)2014 David N. Wilson

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Classic Narrated Wonderfully by Robert Fass

Imagin being a cop on a call and being attacked by dogs. These aren't any or ordinary dogs, these dogs are Wolfen. And they don't just bite they tear your body to pieces leaving only blood and body parts behind.  Now your a detective assigned to investigate the murder of your fellow officers. How would you explain the Wolfen? Could you? They know your scent and are tracking you. What is your move.

That is the story behind Whitley Strieber's Wolfen Narrated expertly by Robert Fass. This Audiobook is a captivating listen from start to finish and kept me intrigued as to what would happen next.

This audiobook is available on Audible.com

I received this audiobook from the Narrator for an honest review.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Brilliant early work from supremo Whitley Strieber

Engaging from the start, with a brilliant performance from narrator Robert Fass, this story belies the encounters with unknown presences that were to later shape much of this writer's career.

A masterful horror work, if this could be conveyed with the same distinction into film it would be an instant classic, like the book itself surely is.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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First read when I was in my twenties ... SCARY!

I've loved this book since the eighties, when I first read it. I passed my book onto others, who also said they stayed up at night, fearing the Wolfen and keeping the lights on and blinds closed. The movie was the worst adaptation of a book I had seen, up until Dean Koontz's Watchers was ruined onscreen. With today's CGI, this could be a classic horror movie that scares your pants off, so I really hope someone does another one and sticks to the book!

The premise that these creatures were the basis for the werewolf stories made perfect sense, and the way Strieber describes the claw they cast from the muddy impression at the junkyard, you are fearful just hearing about its perfect killing design.

This book will be worth every hour listening to it - or reading it. I look forward to sharing it with an entire new generation of horror lovers. Enjoy - and you're welcome!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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clever, fiendish werewolves...

If you like werewolves then this one is for you, these werewolves are very cunning and the story is pretty brisk from the very start, while it will not go down in history as a 5-star work of Brilliance it is a good listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Non stop action

The narrative in this book keeps you wanting to know what's next. The best book I've heard so far.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Stop look listen and pray

Lock the windows and doors there is nothing you can do to stop them I'm getting to you scary now go check and double check the windows

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Different.

This is my first time reading this and it was not at all what I expected!! The story is about 2 police officers who stumble upon an age old secret that is intent on keeping it a secret any way they can!! Initially I thought this was about the typical werewolves but it's not and I think because I went into this having not read the blurb nor any reviews, is why I ended up enjoying it so much.

Anyway, this is a well written (for it's time) and entertaining story. I loved how it was told from the Police officers and the Wolfen's POV. It was eerie being inside their heads! It is also quite a gorey book but I've read worse! If you want a unique werewolf read and one that will keep your attention throughout, then this is one you should try.

Robert Fass was really good. He nailed the tenseness of certain situations and had me biting my nails waiting to see what happened!

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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not bad

saw the movie first.... there night an day diffrent. The book is a combination horror gritty cop murder mystery. the characters are all deeply flawed an honestly a little over dramatic at times but the story is excellent. dont look for witty humor cause its not there. also violence is pretty graphic (not a complaint) but thats actully nescary for the narative. As horror novels go its definitly worth your read but dont try to even link it to the movie....

  • Overall
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Wolves terrorize New York City

Robert Fass does a great job narrating this terrifying story and portraying all the different characters both human and Wolfen. Not for the faint of heart.

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Resisted reading any Whitley Strieber...

... for decades. I've always had a problem with people who go along with crap like Close Encounters of the Fourth Kind (i.e., abduction by the crew of a UFO, by space aliens).

Lately, I've been tentatively dipping into the vast pool of the works of writers who sell snake oil of a kind, but whose every dose sold is reputed to be decanted to a well-crafted vial of a book, from an aged oak (or whatever wood is supposed to be best for the storage of snake oil) barrel of a mind.

Strieber's work was recommended in Stephen King's _Danse Macabre_, his meditation upon archetypal horror stories and horror story elements. The King who wrote _Danse Macabre_ is the King who wrote vivid, inspired updates of Lovecraft and resettings/updates of William Hope Hodgson (for instance, Bobbi Anderson and her dog, Peter, who are clearly direct descendants of Hodgson's unnamed character/narrator, The Recluse, and his dog, Pepper, from _The House on the Borderlands_).

I took the recommendation, and I am not sorry I did.

In several pieces of writing, King says that Strieber is a better writer than King, himself, is. He's right. Strieber also does a very good job of keeping the New York of Tom Wolfe's _The Bonfire of the Vanities_'s era well-preserved in amber. It's the same New York encountered by anyone who's seen the pilot episode of the first of the Law & Orders, "Everybody's Favorite Bagman."

And the Wolfen, themselves, are a treat among treats. They are a convincingly-written and invented, mythical, hidden, apex predator species, whose evolution's at times complete hiddenness from the recorders of mankind's historians and chroniclers is described and explained in a way that, if such a species actuallly existed, would have been a plausible and totally possible unseen strand of their warped woof [sorry. couldn't help myself] thread in the tapestry of history.

There is nothing supernatural or Mary Sue-ish about the Wolfen or about the humans, in this werewolves-added version of the Earth and New York. The Wolfen are flawed, and the humans are flawed and conscious of the fallen state of humanity. The Wolfen have not yet figured out that their lack of opposable thumbs, and their inability to display or feel true humbleness or humility, is what causes them to fall, time and time again, out of their own State of Grace, which consists largely of cities described in terms that are a carnivorous anthropophage's version of the Garden of Eden. Their pride in their superior senses, agility, strength, and speed are the causes of their repeated Fall from Grace in the eyes of Man.

There's a lot more. But this is the first convincing construction of a believable werewolf species I have ever come across.