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Publisher's Summary

Long ago, a human astrophysicist, Inigo, began dreaming scenes from the life of a remarkable human being named Edeard, who lived within the Void, a self-contained microuniverse at the heart of the galaxy.

There, under the beneficent gaze of mysterious godlike entities, humans possessed uncanny psychic abilities, and Edeard's were the strongest of all. Equally strong was his determination to bring justice and freedom to a world terrorized by criminal violence and corruption.

Inigo's inspirational dreams, shared by hundreds of millions throughout the galaxy-spanning gaiafield, gave birth to a religion - Living Dream. But when the appearance of a Second Dreamer seemed to trigger the expansion of the Void - an expansion that is devouring everything in its path -the Intersolar Commonwealth was thrown into turmoil. With the adherents of Living Dream determined to set forth on a dangerous pilgrimage into the Void, interstellar war threatens to erupt.

With time running out, the fate of humanity hinges on a handful of people. There is Araminta, only now awakening to the unwelcome fact that she is the mysterious Second Dreamer - and to the dire responsibilities that go with it; Inigo, whose private dreams hint at a darker truth behind Edeard's legendary life; Paula Myo, the ruthless field operative of the Commonwealth, whose search for Araminta and Inigo is about to yield a most unpleasant surprise; and Justine, whose desperate gamble places her within the Void, where the godlike Skylords hold the power to save the universe...or destroy it.

Dream on: listen to the first book, The Dreaming Void.
©2008 Peter F. Hamilton (P)2009 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"Fusing elements of hard SF with adventure fantasy tropes, Hamilton has singlehandedly raised the bar for grand-scale speculative storytelling." ( Publishers Weekly)
"This second book of a trilogy promises a spectacular finish." ( Booklist)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • 2 Stars
    39
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Performance

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Story

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Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

wtf?

Nothing like the first couple. Horrible story line, boring characters, and a ton of pointless dialogue. Don't waste your time.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Bonnie
  • hayward, CA, United States
  • 07-12-15

couldn't wait for the end


Boring. Way too many words. Two weak stories woven together. I will not bother with the next book

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Less Sci-Porn than book one

I think Mr. Hamilton got the message about his crude imaginations.
Book 2 has leaves out the slams against Christians, and has less clone orgies, but it is still dull.
I will not be reading any more of this author.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Too long and drawn out.

This story was very long and drawn out. The relationship between the two stories was too diverse to have a clear flow of the overall story

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Drawn Out

would have been better if he left out alot...I mean its just so drawn out and for no real good reason. Could have been so much better.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Disappointing Follow Up to the Commonwealth Saga

I thoroughly enjoyed the 2 preceding books by Hamilton but this trilogy falls flat. The basic structure of the story is split into 2 parts: One part in the same universe as Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained, and one "story within a story" faux-fantasy fable that takes all 3 books to play out.

In itself, this structure makes it hard to immerse oneself in the story. Whenever one side gets going you are suddenly plucked into a completely different universe and timeline. Even with that doubling of content, the entire series story-line could have been easily developed and resolved in a third of the time. In particular the fantasy section is little more than a basic Twilight Zone plot, yet the basic cliche at its center is dragged out over the full series.

The primary story-line retains some of what made the prior books fun, but its events are too fractured by the intrusive story within a story, and also feels unnecessarily stretched out. The whole thing feels like a novella worthy concept artificially stretched to 65 hours. Disappointing.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

A conservative utopian wet dream

First, narration is great, and the parts of the book that are actually science fiction are great as well, which is why I'm so far in this book series. As for the rest, where do I begin.

First, there is so much emphasis on sex that it starts to throw me off the story, and it's perhaps more distracting since it sounds like it was writen by a teenager who's never been with a woman. Every female character in every single scene is objectified, propositioned and somehow unphased. Not to mention that every single one is a perfect little sex doll, amazing in bed, and down for the kinkiest things imaginable, EVERY SINGLE ONE (I'm a 28 yo male, and this made me uncomfortable)

Second, no character development, the psychology of every character is extremely rigid, there is great detail describing their past and what lead them this point but no real but no change or progression during the time line of the book itself.

I just wish there was more sci-fi and less sexual harassment.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

More of the dissapointment

What would have made The Temporal Void better?

The book is part 2 in a series that seemed more fantasy than science fiction. The enjoyable part of the novel is seeing how characters introduced in the 1000 year prequel

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Mark
  • Federal Way, WA, United States
  • 01-19-11

Terrible

75% of the story is about a 15yr old cop called the "water walker" Boring slow and hardly anything of previous books by Hamilton. Total disapointment skip this one unless you are into stories about 15yr old cops. Hamilton was one of my favorite writers but not anymore I wont be ripped off by this author ever again.

17 of 24 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Disappointing after Judas Unchained

(Second part of review; see "The Dreaming Void" for first half.) This time around the author feels the need to throw in way too much sex; it's not erotic like it was in Pandora's Star / Judas Unchained. It feels adolescent and contrived. In Eddyard's world there is a lot of swearing, except it's so stupid. They have a religion based on veneration of "The Lady" - who knows why - and every curse phrase substitutes "The Lady" for where we would say "God" ... e.g., "The Lady damn you!". This becomes silly to the extreme. Here's an example of how bad this is: at some point, one of the wizards says that going into the House of the Blue Petals was "the ruin of many a poor boy!" - the Animals would love this, eh? The ending reveals little, and certainly doesn't leave you hanging in suspense such as the end of Pandora's Star. This whole thing reminds me of how much I loved Snow Crash, only to find the succeeding novels not nearly as good. Well, there you have it - it's up to you!

16 of 23 people found this review helpful