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The Man with the Golden Typewriter

Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (34 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

On 16 August 1952, Ian Fleming wrote to his wife, Ann, 'My love, This is only a tiny letter to try out my new typewriter and to see if it will write golden words since it is made of gold'.

And he did write golden words: 14 best-selling James Bond books, and an equally energetic flow of letters to his wife, publisher, editors, fans, friends and critics, charting 007's progress with correspondence that ranged from badgering Jonathan Cape about his quota of free copies - a coin was tossed; Fleming lost - to apologising for having mistaken a certain brand of perfume and for equipping Bond with the wrong kind of gun.

©2015 Ian Fleming and Fergus Fleming (P)2015 Audible, Ltd

Critic Reviews

"British actor Julian Rhind-Tutt thoughtfully and expressively narrates the letters of author Ian Fleming, creator of James Bond.... Rhind-Tutt's voice has a warmth and charm that mesh well with the text.... Fleming's many fans will enjoy this inside look at the author and his works." (AudioFile)

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Ian Fleming revealed through his letters

Because these are the original letters of Ian Fleming, this is also the original voice of Ian Fleming. And to hear it is to marvel as we learn more of his inner self, his humor, and his pains.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Jonathan Melville
  • Jonathan Melville
  • 06-14-19

Essential for Bond fans

An essential listen for any James Bond fan who wants to better understand 007’s “biographer”, Ian Fleming.

There’s a huge range of correspondence between Fleming and various publishers, agents, illustrators, friends, family and fans, all read by Julian Rhind-Tutt in the audiobook.

A few important areas are skipped over (such as the Thunderball court case), but in many cases there are other books or resources that cover them in greater detail (The Battle for Bond in the case of Thunderball).

A real joy to listen to.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • SirChutney
  • 12-02-18

Fleming, the man, so likable and charming

The Man with the Golden Typewriter succeeds in showing an Ian Fleming much different from the one who narrates Bond. To his professional contacts and friends he was amusing and generous. To his fans he was the ideal author to receive a letter from: courteous, amusing and appreciative. Even as his health started to fail he kept up a breezy manner to amuse anyone who concerned about him. His style has the flair of his 007 novels. But the letters add a warm, conversational tone. The Fleming in these letters embodies the ideal qualities of the British gentleman.

Editor Fergus Fleming (Ians nephew) is a celebrated non-fiction author in his own right. He has tracked down a diverse range of letters and even obscure Sunday Times pieces. He arranges these with care. He also adds relevant biographical information and summaries of the Bond novels . This adds important context to the letters which are for the most part organized chronologically.

Each batch corresponding to the evolution and reception of a different Bond book. Maybe ordering all the letters by date would have made more sense? But Fergus’s order is easier for the lay reader to digest. The are a few exceptions to the novel-based groupings. These are chapters devoted to Fleming’s correspondence with

* Ernie Cuneo,
* Major Boothroyd,
* Raymond Chandler, and
* Yale Librarian Herman Liebert.

You get the impression that Fleming was a nice chap. Especially in his correspondence back to members of the public who have written to him. His replies always show courtesy and warmth.

In short, this is a book that is far more interesting and entertaining than you might have thought; you don’t have to be a Bond nut to enjoy it. The underlying story is sad: as Fleming’s health failed, his marriage disintegrated and the quality of the books dipped. But for much of the book we are revelling in Fleming’s success ...

So, all in all worth reading. Or even better get the audio book and listen to the excellent narration

1 of 1 people found this review helpful