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Publisher's Summary

Valerie got between us just like I feared she would. And completely destroyed me. But I believe Deacon and I can make it work, that I can have the family I've always wanted...if I just have faith.

©2020 Victoria Quinn (P)2020 Victoria Quinn

What listeners say about The Man Who Has No Sight

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Wonderful story!

As another listener stated, this romance is a very slow burn, beginning with a close friendship and evolving into a romantic one over four books. The result is a story more romantic than overtly sexual, although the sex between the couple is certainly steamy once their relationship changes. Michael Ferraiulo and Lia Langola are always superb as narrators.

One important detail that bears mentioning here: Throughout the series of books, the brilliant medical researcher (Deacon) is very awkward in social interactions, communicates with people only on a very limited number of topics, does not form intimate connections, has difficulty recognizing the moods/feelings of others, and doesn’t understand irony or jokes. This is strong evidence of Asperger’s syndrome, which is on the autism spectrum. However, by not explaining that Deacon has Asperger’s, the author provides no context for his behaviors, making it appear that he is psychologically impaired. By introducing and explaining Asperger’s, the author could have educated listeners about Deacon’s challenges. I think this missing piece is essential for Deacon’s character development and for readers/listeners to recognize that he did not “choose” his unusual behavior and communication style.