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Publisher's Summary

Perhaps the greatest poem of the Western world, The Iliad tells the story of 50 critical days towards the end of the Trojan war. Achilles has quarrelled with Agamemnon and sulks in his tent, while Hector brings his Trojans to the brink of victory; but fate will have the last word.
Public Domain (P)2006 Naxos AudioBooks

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent version

The translation by Ian Johnston is immediately accessible without sacrificing the epic forms -- rhythmic metaphors, ritualized repetition, heroic epithets. The reading by Anton Lesser is crisp, clear, and fast-moving. Great job. This being a Naxos audiobook, the only thing missing is music; but once I realized it wasn't there, I didn't miss it: I kept getting caught up in the sweep of the narrative.

43 of 43 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Easy on the ears, food for the mind

I waited for some time before finally braving The Iliad. I was frankly intimidated, assuming (from experience reading other epic poetry) that a good translation would be extremely difficult to listen to and comprehend. I was so wrong!

This translation and this narrator make Homer come alive.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Michael
  • Gibsonia, PA, United States
  • 05-03-10

Great way to enjoy a difficult classic

As a reader who reads for the story itself (vs. how the story is told), the Iliad would have been a difficult read for me given its age and "flowery language", but this format and Lesser's narration make it a very enjoyable experience. If you want to enjoy this classic, this is the way to do it.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • MR
  • 04-13-13

the best of the lot

i had tried to listen to other versions of this, many being too mono tone and boring and it had put me off till i started this one and it was brought more to life. it is well read and draws you in to an epic story that at times you just want to keep listening.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • David S
  • 07-08-13

Brilliant!

What made the experience of listening to The Iliad the most enjoyable?

I've read several versions of the Iliad, but I really enjoyed this audiobook version. Anton Lesser's performance in particular really brings the book to life, which made it all the more enjoyable.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Hector would be my favourite character as the Greek heroes tend to be pillocks!

Have you listened to any of Anton Lesser’s other performances? How does this one compare?

I've not had any other books read by Anton Lesser, but I intend to as I was very impressed with his performance.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The most moving moment for me would have to be Priam's supplication of Achilles. After his son Hector is killed and dragged back to the Achaean ships to be fed to dogs, Priam goes to his son's killer to beg for his body. The dignity of Priam is brought into sharp relief in this scene as he sits at Achilles' feet and begs for his son's body.

Any additional comments?

Anyone who thinks this is anything like that dreadful film with Brad Pitt is mistaken. The Iliad is a wonderful story that was unfortunately butchered in the film Troy.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robert Garton
  • 03-22-17

Brilliant !!!

Fantastic performance, wonderful story telling. Really enjoyed it from start to finish. Highly recommend it 👏👏👏👏👏👏

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sarah Hutchinson
  • 06-02-15

Very good for revision

Really good, very useful for revision even though it wasn't the right translation! Highly recommend!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • David
  • 12-23-12

A good listen

The narration and writing of this ancient story is a good and reasonably-easy listen. The old tales are the best, but it's not often that they can be 'read' and digested.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Stephen Lumsden
  • 09-16-18

<br />

Delivery of reader good, story not as complete as I thought, wrestled with so many characters

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Mr. Sp Howley
  • 04-13-18

A good retelling of the classic war story

The narrator is quite good, classics always suit a British narrator over an American in my opinion. It's worth noting that the Iliad is not the complete story of the Trojan war, only covering the section between the arguments of Achilles and Agamemnon and the burial of Hector. There is no Trojan Horse here.

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  • Robert Stockton
  • 06-28-18

Good to know!

Not exactly a page turner, but a fascinating look into literary history. It was certainly good enough for me to now deem it necessary to read The Odyssey, which is like a sequel.