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Publisher's Summary

Christine Bennett has left the cloistered world of nuns for the profane world of New York State, where murder and madness are often linked. At a town meeting, Christine volunteers to investigate a 40-year-old murder case long since closed. Now she'll move heaven and earth to exonerate a pair of retarded savant twins, now senior citizens, of their mother's murder on Good Friday in 1950.

©1992 Lee Harris (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • connie
  • Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 12-29-12

Polite procedural cozy

Gentle, slow paced and undemanding, this has the feel of a 70s-80s publication rather than the stated 1990-ish date, mostly due to the language around disability and religious vocation.The former nun's vocation is not central to the story; in fact, the novel is not at all overtly religious but just uses a few cultural elements of Roman Catholicism in its setting. I think anyone with a love for the area around the Hudson would like some of the description, and the author manages to get some period "feel" in the sections reflecting back on the 40 year old crime. There is a slight, PG romance thread.

Although the outcome turns on one almost deus ex machina element, the story mostly rings true as an amateur sleuth procedural, if you don't get hung up on details like civilians having easy access to police files. I'd download more from this series should they be revived by Audible.

The narrator is in a couple of section a little "breathy" but otherwise seems an excellent match for the main character, whose just-turned-30 and just-out-of-convent voice comprises 95% of the novel.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Beatrice
  • Houston, TX, United States
  • 12-23-12

Different but good

This book is different. I have never read a book with a religious person as a lead. I admit I was a bit nervous that the religion aspect would take over the plot. That did not happen. What did happen was an interesting and entertaining book with an engrossing subject matter. The lead character, Christine Bennett, just left the convent and is trying to find her way in the secular world when she gets thrown into a murder investigation. Not just any murder, but one that happened 50 years ago and involved intellectually disabled twins. This is not a typical cozy mystery. It read like a police procedural with a heavy and serious storyline. Unlike the typical light and fluffy situations in a cozy mystery. The only humor comes with Christine's struggle to fit into her new life as a woman and not a nun. Although it is a serious book, it is good and I will read the next one. Hopefully it lightens up a bit.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Good mystery series beginning

So this is going to be awkward. Somehow, this book was very good almost in spite of itself! It was never a fast-action, edge of your seat sort of book. There was a budding romantic relationship between the policeman who helped Christine, who was just several weeks out of the convent, deal with the crime aspect--so a bit of a stretch there. There was a touch more religious aspect than seemed necessary, one of the key characters was not introduced until the last quarter of the book (surely a good mystery no-no), and it was sort of unbelievable how Christine just knocked on doors, called people and got whatever info she wanted about a 40 year old crime.

This book is like "The Little Engine That Could." It just keeps chugging, and does the job beautifully against all odds. I felt I should have given this book fewer stars for all the ways it felt kind of amateurish. Except that I couldn't, because I was glued to it the whole time. (Narrator could have been better, even that did'nt stop my interest).

I think the things that held this book together were all about the subject matter. A pair of now elderly male twins, who were perhaps amazing autistic savants, had been accused of their mother's murder 40 years previously, after only a cursory police investigation. Christine undertakes to find out whether they were innocent, though reader please note, not necessarily to find who was guilty instead (though that naturally goes with it, but a distinction should be made to understand some of what made the book a little unusual).

The author left me almost in tears as she depicted what the life of these brilliant young men had been, as a result of public ignorance about this condition, and that of others who are different. The two time periods in the book were the early 1950's and roughly 1990-1991 or so. She did a wonderful job of exposing the hurtful (even willful) ignorance and biased attitudes towards people with developmental delays in the two eras, and left little question that while there has been improvement, there is a way yet to go. The author's choice of handling such a sensitive subject matter was a bold, brave move. If future books will be as good as this one was, I'm in line to hear them all.

While this book was technically a mystery, I recommend reading it more because the author chose a daring topic to put at the heart of this mystery. I would like to hope that as she finds her way into more experienced writing, some of the awkwardness of the style will smooth itself out. One reads a mystery expecting a lot of cerebral challenge but in this one, there seemed to be a great challenge to the heart as well. I recommend it as a surprisingly good read.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Great Story

The reader for this interesting mystery did a wonderful job. I didn’t want to stop listening.

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  • Debbie
  • Toney, Alabama
  • 07-29-18

Mellow, Thoughtful, Clean Listen REALLY GOOD!!!

After 15 years as a cloistered nun, Christine Bennett has left the order after inheriting her aunt's home and becoming guardian for her mentally handicapped cousin, Gene. When the group home wants to locate in the neighborhood, a ruckus arises because one of the residents in the group home is supposedly a murderer. While visiting Gene, Christine (Chris) learns that the 40 year old murder case was never solved, and that the twin brothers accused of killing their mother, both mentally challenged, were never formally convicted. Known at the time as "idiot savants", James and Robert, were separated immediately after the murder, and no further investigation was conducted into the murder. When Christine met with the neighborhood residents and the Greenwillow Institution (who wanted to move the group home into their area), she found herself in the odd position of being asked to head up the investigation to prove the twins innocence. With the help of local police officer, Jack Brooks, Christine begins to look into the 40 year old murder. This story is one of the most thought provoking, gentle and kind tales I've ever listened to. And I absolutely love it. The kindness of Chris (fifteen years a nun) who regularly visited her mentally retarded cousin, Gene; the issue of group homes among the neighborhoods of ordinary residents; and the exploitation of those who are different than ourselves, gives us much to think about. I will definitely be listening to the next in the series. Great book!!!

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  • Carmela
  • Walterboro, SC, USA
  • 03-31-18

Great story, great attitude

I was a bit worried getting a story about a nun who leaves the convent because i dont like my light reading to preach to me either for or against religion or politics. i was pleasantly surprised. there is balance and no demagoguery here. the mystery is well contracted and the characters are compeling and likable. will definitely continue the series.

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    4 out of 5 stars

Intriguing mystery of a cold case

Any additional comments?

The storyline of this book really held my attention. I was very interested in the mystery of who killed the mother of a pair of savant twins in 1950 NYC. I found the descriptions of NY and the methods used to research the cold case interesting, and I found the characters emotionally involving. The narrator's sunshiney former nun Chris Bennett is spot on with my mental image (I had read this book once in the past). The ending was emotionally satisfying and I continued on to others in the series. I would like to mention that the twins in the story are repeatedly referred to as retarded (which felt outdated) though they seem to be based on cases of well known autistic savants and as the mother of an autistic child I would have preferred that word.

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On this series

I enjoy this series, but it will not be for everyone. The series is very cozy, kind of mellow, truly comfort listening: There is not a lot of action, there is not a lot of sex, but there is enough going on that I rarely find them boring.

I enjoy Dee Macaluso's readings, and while some people may (and have) found her boring, I find her easy to listen to and her differentiations of characters are good (though occasionally there will be a voice used in one book that has been used already for a different character in another book - but unless you marathon the books you probably wouldn't notice.)

Now, here is something that Audible does that drives me bonkers: they get most books in a series, but leave some out in the middle. Why? WHY????? With this series they leave out a couple in the middle, then add one of the books with a different reader. Again - WHY????

0 of 1 people found this review helpful