The Fox

Narrated by: David Rintoul
Length: 8 hrs and 12 mins
4 out of 5 stars (527 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The number one New York Times best-selling master of international intrigue takes readers into the bleeding-edge world of technological espionage in a propulsive thriller that feels chillingly real.  

Former chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service Adrian Weston is awoken in the middle of the night by a phone call from the prime minister. Her news is shocking: the Pentagon, the NSA, and the CIA have been hacked simultaneously, their seemingly impenetrable firewalls breached by an unknown enemy known only as "The Fox". Even more surprisingly, the culprit is revealed to be a young British teenager, Luke Jennings. He has no agenda, no secrets, just a blisteringly brilliant mind. Extradition to the US seems likely - until Weston has another idea: If Luke can do this to us, what can he do to our enemies?  

After conferring with both the American president and the prime minister, Weston is determined to use "The Fox" and his talents to the advantage of the two nations. But doing so places the boy on a geopolitical minefield. Adrian must stay one step ahead of multiple invisible enemies, all while finding a way to utilize the most powerful - and most unpredictable - weapon of all.  

With his trademark research and deep knowledge of the rules and practices of international intrigue, Forsyth takes on tomorrow's threats in this race-against-the-clock thriller.

©2018 Frederick Forsyth (P)2018 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about The Fox

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Modern Story with Classic Prose

Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox".

Not only is writing a thriller in which the antagonist is a computer hacker difficult, it is hard to make it into a "thriller." Typically thrillers have a bad guy with fantastical skills that rival the protagonist, which is why I was a little apprehensive when starting this book. Part of it, and this may make me a little ageist, was the fact that an 80-year-old was writing it.

BUT...Forsyth delivered magnificently! This was a great book, with a plot that continued to move along, and it truly kept me captivated until the end. Also, as someone who works in the computer/software industry, Forsyth nailed every term and piece that revolves around the tech industry.

You also have to admit that Forsyth is one of the best writers out there, meaning his prose is stellar, his characters are dynamic, his plots are realistic and believable, and his books keep you engaged and hooked.

I loved this book, and David Rintoul was the perfect narrator for this audiobook. I highly recommend it!

26 people found this helpful

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Forsyth is the Master

I have loved his writing for years, but this may truly be my favorite since Eye of the Needle. The characters, the plotting, and the narration are all superb. You will not be disappointed.

6 people found this helpful

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Pass

I tried to finish this book. I hoped it would get better. I almost always finish books. This one was really hard to follow. The plot was vague. There were different tangential storylines that were not connected. The characters were not developed.

5 people found this helpful

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Not a classic

I'm honestly just really confused by this book. I was super excited for a new Forsyth book. But there were none of the elements that make a Forsyth book great. No twists. No impossible dilemmas to be solved. No difficulties to be surmounted. We're just presented with an autistic youth who can miraculously hack his way into ANYTHING. This character isn't really a character though, as he gets no character development whatsoever. He's just a deus ex machina. It's more of a rambling "wouldn't it be cool if" than it is a novel.

8 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

This is a good one

Well written, editing is excellent, interesting story, in depth and real characters, there is an interest in beginning and a realistic ending
Highly recommend

8 people found this helpful

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Riveting mesmerizing jolly good story

Forsyth has struck with a super story.Oh if it were only true
Makes me search for another of his well thought out tales

3 people found this helpful

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A very enjoyable listen

Great listen with present day themes .
Also the narrative was perfect
Glad I purchased this audio.

3 people found this helpful

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The long dull Fox jumped over the lazy shark

I know it's actually; The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. But mine's more accurate in this particular instance. I love Frederick Forsyth, The Day of the Jackal is still a favorite of mine to this day. But, as another reviewer said, Forsyth is in his 80's and though he does incorporate tech jargon and a basic level of technological understanding, this premise is a bit ridiculous and the story suffers as a result. The hacker, who is apparently super human thanks to his Asperger's, is a very one dimensional character who does the impossible with antiquated technology. It would be like trying to win a formula one race in a pedal car. You could try, but it wouldn't work- even if you have Asperger's. Shark jumped.

All in all to me this story was very flat and lacked the kind of suspense filled moments and dramatic flair I've come enjoy from Forsyth and other authors of his ilk. I feel like, if this book was released under another unknown author's name, i feel like the reviews would be less flattering. This story seemed longer than it was because the story lacked those charged moments that make time fly. This was a bit of a let down for me. But then again maybe my expectations were just too high.

3 people found this helpful

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Unique integration of history, politics & technolo

Revealing. Story telling takes me by storm. Utmost understanding of the history, political situation and integrating technological knowledge into woven story is indeed unparalleled.

2 people found this helpful

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A Master of action storytelling has lost his touch

The hallmark of Forsyth's books has always been his attention to detail. You always felt like he had researched the topic because he brought nuanced tidbits to the narrative that made it feel real. Unfortunately, this book does not live up to that standard. The author makes repeated technical mistakes on both cybersecurity and physical systems. Simple research, and reading a few books on the topic, would have added substantial detail. For example, cybersecurity penetrations typically involve human factors. An air gap is really an air gap. There's no way you can sit in London and hack your way through an air gap someplace else. The only way to do it is to get somebody to take the software on a flash drive across the air gap or connect the isolated system to the internet. The sad part about this, is that the real story, recruiting or tricking a human participant, would be a lot more interesting the sterile "hacker at a distance" approach that Forsyth used.

This is one of several similar mistakes throughout the book. As a result it's not realistic, and you keep getting jarred by a lack of understanding on how these sophisticated systems work.

1 person found this helpful