The Fifth Witness

Narrated by: Peter Giles
Series: A Lincoln Lawyer Novel, Book 4
Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (9,534 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Mickey Haller has fallen on tough times. He expands his business into foreclosure defense, only to see one of his clients accused of killing the banker she blames for trying to take away her home.

Mickey puts his team into high gear to exonerate Lisa Trammel, even though the evidence and his own suspicions tell him his client is guilty. Soon after he learns that the victim had black market dealings of his own, Haller is assaulted, too - and he's certain he's on the right trail.

Despite the danger and uncertainty, Haller mounts the best defense of his career in a trial where the last surprise comes after the verdict is in. Connelly proves again why he "may very well be the best novelist working in the United States today" (San Francisco Chronicle).

©2011 Michael Connelly (P)2011 Hachette Audio

What listeners say about The Fifth Witness

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    5,226
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Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Very enjoyable read

I rarely buy a book with less than a 4 star average rating for at least 200 reviews. This means most people give it a 4 or a 5. I ignore the 1's 2's and look at the average being greater than 4. This was a great read. Its intriguing plot with great insights on criminal court issues in Los Angeles, my home town, made this a very pleasurable read. I recommend highly.

24 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

You can't put this one down

Michael Connelly is one of the best mystery writers today. He not only can tell a story but he gives you characters you want to return to again and again. Harry Bosch is as good a detective as you can find. Cassie West almost makes you forget about Lisbeth Salander. And if you ever need a good lawyer, there is none better than Mickey Haller.

Haller has appeared in four Connelly books but does his best work in The Fifth Witness. The story is fast paced and has enough twists and turns for even the most demanding mystery reader. He give you plenty of characters to cheer and a few to boo. The end is not only satisfying but sets us up for a future Haller adventure. My only regret is that I can't give this book six stars.

41 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Five stars? Really? Yes, really.

I awarded this one five stars, although I rarely rate anything that highly. And before I gush, I have to say that audio versions show up Michael Connelly's writing style for what it is: a pedestrian, "just the facts, Ma'am" deadpan that is quicker to read than to listen to. However, this one kept me awake and listening because Connelly keeps the plot propelling along nicely. The narrator, Peter Giles, is pitch perfect as Mickey Haller. If you have followed his adventures in previous books, you know Mickey, his ex-wives, his daughter, and the rest of his entourage. That story line continues in the context of a new legal thriller that revolves around the foreclosure debacle. Connolly oversimplifies that situation, but, after all this is a page-turner pop novel, not an article in The Economist:) And Connelly plays fair, providing sufficient info to figure things out. Highly entertaining, with a boffo ending that sets things up for the next in the series. Go, Mickey!

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Very Good Read!

I have enjoyed all the Harry Bosch and Mickey Haller books - this one does not disappoint!

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Energy

This book keeps you wondering, what will happen next. Its good to listen to while driving, because it keeps you alert and on the edge about what happens next,

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Haller's OK, the narrator's horrible

I count myself as a huge Connelly fan, having read and listened to all of his books, some of them several times. Mickey Haller is starting to wear on me. He's lost a lot of the pathos he had in the beginning. He's up, he's down, he's with his ex-wife, he's not. Enough already. That being said, the story was bland and just never seemed to get out of neutral. It could have been a passable listen, except for Peter Giles. Bottom line, the guy is awful. He has three voices: basic (for most male characters), growl (for all other male characters), and soft (for all women). Len Cariou's understated gravitas in the later Bosch books could carry the one-note gig off, but Peter Giles is no Len Cariou. When the next Bosch book is out in November, I'm praying Peter Giles is otherwise occupied.

19 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

Kept waiting for the shoe to drop

I bought this based on rave reviews and it was disappointing. A lot of courtroom procedure with too many lose ends. I think the TV Perry Mason does a better job, and it only takes an hour. I liked the character development, though, both the client and the lawyer. Other characters relied a bit too much on cliche. ++semi spoiler alert++ i knew the secret about the client's husband from the first time he was mentioned, and Haller (the lawyer) should have too. I kept waiting and waiting for him to tumble to it, and to a couple of other things. For a smart guy, he was could be pretty dense.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Big Connelly fan...but not because of this book.

I have read/listened to everything Connelly has put out and this just isn't up to his standards. I'm not a tough critic, and I'm not expecting great "literature" but this book follows a similar pattern to the others in the Lincoln Lawyer series which would be be fine if done in an interesting way. This just didn't deliver for me. Peter Giles has read other books in the Lincoln Lawyer series, so I didn't have a problem with his narration. I am surprised by the volume of positive reviews...to each their own, I guess.

I'm still a Connelly fan, but I couldn't wait for this one to end.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Mickey Haller

Mick is my favorite MC character. 5th Witness was not as good as the previous 2 Mickey books but still a great listen. It gets an extra star due to the great performance by Peter Giles. Giles once again does an excellent job bringing Mick to life. How anyone think Giles doesnt do a great job with Mickey is beyond me.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

The worst

Not the worst thing I've ever read, just the worst by Connelly. (WARNING: I'm going to say something about the plot.) I am a lawyer and find real court room matters intriguing, but even I was bored by the tedium of slogging through the minutiae of pre-trial discovery and investigation, pre-trial motions and the trial itself. And if you are going to write such a novel, you should at least make what happens plausible. Haller has a witness completely destroyed by a piece of blatant hearsay which any first year associate could easily have kept out of evidence but which the brilliant Haller doesn't even object to. And the balloon trick? Wouldn't this have been more likely to draw the attention of other people in the parking lot of a busy office building at just the time everyone is arriving at work, rather than end up being the brilliant trick of a devious mind? And what about all those other people? No explanation at all as to why there were no witnesses. I think this shows that Connelly is running out of gas--understandable after all the best-sellers he's written.

4 people found this helpful