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The Family Next Door

The Heartbreaking Imprisonment of the 13 Turpin Siblings and Their Extraordinary Rescue
Narrated by: Shaun Grindell
Length: 8 hrs and 1 min
Categories: Nonfiction, True Crime
4 out of 5 stars (37 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

From New York Times best-selling true crime author John Glatt comes the devastating story of the Turpins: a seemingly normal family whose dark secrets would shock and captivate the world.

On January 14, 2018, a 17-year-old girl climbed out of the window of her Perris, California home and dialed 911 with shaking fingers. Struggling to stay calm, she told the operator that she and her 12 siblings - ranging in age from two to 29 - were being abused by their parents. When the dispatcher asked for her address, the girl hesitated. "I've never been out," she stammered.

To their family, neighbors, and online friends, Louise and David Turpin presented a picture of domestic bliss: dressing their 13 children in matching outfits and buying them expensive gifts. But what police discovered when they entered the Turpin family home would eclipse the most shocking child abuse cases in history.

In the first major account of the case, investigative journalist and author John Glatt delves into the disturbing details and recounts the bravery of the 13 siblings in the face of unimaginable horror.

©2019 John Glatt (P)2019 Tantor

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Deja Vu

The author tells of the horrors from the kids side then again at the end during the hearing using the exact same words. That irritated me. I actually checked the chapter once because I knew I'd heard that previously.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Rehashed other writers

If this book sounds “stolen from the headlines” it’s because the author reworked every newspaper and sound byte on the story. Ultimately, I read nothing that I had not gleaned from earlier newspaper articles. The writing is as choppy as a book could be after taking other articles and relieving them into one semi coherent work.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Not my insight.

There isn't much here a quick Google search or Wikipedia won't tell you other than the 911 call transcript. The author mentions the kids all kept journals recording their day to day life but there isn't a excerpt from any of them. I enjoyed the author's other works but this one left me feeling let down.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Sloppy Journalism

The story is absolutely intriguing. The writing is not. The author never seems to have actually interviewed anyone close to the family to give a view inside the home. Instead we are left with lots of quotes from facebook (lots of facebook!), quotes from news articles, CNN, and court transcripts. But the author himself doesn't bring anything new to the story, he just piles his resources up. Worse, he doesn't even organize the material in an interesting way.

We are never really given a look inside the house, but kept at arms distance. None of the children seem to have been interviewed by the author. So he relies on other peoples notes.

The end of the book drags on and on as he reports every courtroom move. This is not high courtroom drama, but a rehash of what he's already told us. Worse, every courtroom objection is logged; every back and forth from each witness. Because, if nothing else, the author has the court transcript, and he intends to get the most out of it. Audible would do just as well just recording the court transcript.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Could be a good story but narrator kills it

The Narrator kills the story and it just seems to drag!! I put it on while I was cleaning because I wanted to hear what really happen to those poor kids but it offered little more than any of the news specials did.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Heartbreaking story, but bad narration

This is a horrific story, but the Turpin children seem to be getting on with their lives as the judge says, "...in spite of them" (their parents). Story is told well, but narrator is not the best. He seems to be asking a question with every sentence.??

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-04-19

Not interesting

Repetitive in parts and pretty much a review of everything already reported in the media. Towards the end was just a reread of court transcripts.