Regular price: $20.97

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

In these Messenger Lectures, originally delivered at Cornell University and recorded for television by the BBC, Richard Feynman offers an overview of selected physical laws and gathers their common features into one broad principle of invariance. He maintains at the outset that the importance of a physical law is not "how clever we are to have foundit out but…how clever nature is to pay attention to it" and steers his discussions toward a final exposition of the elegance and simplicity of all scientific laws. Rather than an essay on the most significant achievements in modern science, The Character of Physical Lawis a statement of what is most remarkable in nature. Feynman’s enlightened approach, his wit, and his enthusiasm make this a memorable exposition of the scientist’s craft. The law of gravitation is the author’s principal example. Relating the details of its discovery and stressing its mathematical character, he uses it to demonstrate the essential interaction of mathematics and physics. He views mathematics as the key to any system of scientific laws, suggesting that if it were possible to fill out the structure of scientific theory completely, the result would be an integrated set of mathematical axioms. The principles of conservation, symmetry, and time irreversibility are then considered in relation to developments in classical and modern physics, and in his final lecture, Feynman develops his own analysis of the process and future of scientific discovery.

Like any set of oral reflections, The Character of Physical Law has special value as a demonstration of the mind in action. The reader is particularly lucky in Richard Feynman - one of the most eminent and imaginative modern physicists.

©1965 Richard Feynman (P)2013 Blackstone Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    73
  • 4 Stars
    25
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    57
  • 4 Stars
    22
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    62
  • 4 Stars
    21
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An amazing and thought provoking lecture.

Enjoyed the lecture immensely. Delightful and thought provoking, and highly recommended for those with scientific curiosity.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Recommended for the Feynman fan.

Feynman was one of the best lecturers in recent history. This lecture is an engaging and intellectually stimulating talk about how science is done, the relationship between science and math, and intriguing ideas from modern physics.

While the narrator is excellent (even his accent is reminiscent of Feynmans), this audiobook is not as engaging as a video recording (such recordings exist). It also lacks the occasional visual figures, but these problems do not detract from the overall quality.

I wouldn't recommend it as your first Feynman book ("Surely You Must Be Joking Mr Feynman" has that laurel), but I would recommend it if you wished his biographies talked more about physics.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Better read than listened to

Bought the audio book to renew my love of this great book. Because of the math , however, it should be read.