• The Case for Climate Capitalism

  • Economic Solutions for a Planet in Crisis
  • By: Tom Rand
  • Narrated by: Jim Seybert
  • Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: Money & Finance, Economics
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

A warming climate and a general distrust of Wall Street has opened a new cultural divide: Anti-market critics from Naomi Klein to the Pope target capitalism itself as a root cause of climate change, while neoconservatives who diminish the climate threat are in favor of market fundamentalism.

Tom Rand argues that both sides in this emerging cultural war are ill-equipped to provide solutions to the climate crisis, and each is remarkably naïve in their view of capitalism. On one hand, we cannot possibly transition off fossil fuels without the financial might and entrepreneurial talent market forces alone can unlock. On the other, without radical changes to the way markets operate, capitalism will take us right off the climate cliff. 

Rejecting the old Left/Right ideologies, Rand develops a more pragmatic view capable of delivering practical solutions to this critical problem. A renewed capitalism harnessed to the task is the only way we might replace fossil fuels fast enough to mitigate severe climate risk. If we leave our dogma at the door, Rand argues, we might just build an economy that survives the century.

©2020 Dreamscape Media, LLC (P)2020 Dreamscape Media, LLC

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Awesome read.

Somehow pessimistic and optimistic at the same time. Realistic suggestions those in charge would be wise to consider.

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  • Brian
  • 07-07-20

A way out for the human race.

It makes sense to use existing mechanisms for the must have funding if we are to save the world. If done properly, this model would seem to be fair to all, and not put all the suffering on the poor.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 03-28-20

Regulate Capitalism to solve climate disruption

This book rejects the more radical socialism ideologies and instead focuses on wisely regulating capitalism to consider the environment in economic calculations.

Of particular interest are examples of some environmentally clean solutions being more profitable in addition to being more clean. So even if a company didn't care about the environment, they would still be motivated by the bottom line.

Ceasing growth is not an option, growth still needs to happen, especially because innovation is necessary, but techno-optimism alone also won't solve the problem. We need tech combined with economic redirection.

A negative aspect of the book is he proposes "leaving politics at the door", but then goes against his own advice as he fantasizes about rewarding hysterical panic activists and shaming conservatives. Im not even conservative, but it's easy enough to empathize with how unsupportive they may feel towards climate action under such treatment.

Putting the author's personal stance aside, I still urge conservatives and libertarians to read this as it has some good ideas. If politics really were left at the door, with liberals dropping the social justice and anti-capitalism bias from their climate solutions sandwich and conservatives dropping incumbent fossil fuel industry bias from their climate solutions sandwich. Then mixed tech solutions such as efficient buildings and shared transport with regulatory solutions such as reformed WTO, carbon taxes and economic 'onramps' to help against incumbants may get us through the 21st century.