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The Apache Wars

The Hunt for Geronimo, the Apache Kid, and the Captive Boy Who Started the Longest War in American History
Narrated by: Jonathan Yen
Length: 17 hrs and 50 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (384 ratings)
Regular price: $29.95
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Publisher's Summary

They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides - the Apaches and the white invaders - blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who moved uneasily between the worlds of the Apaches and the American soldiers, he was never trusted by either but desperately needed by both. He was the only man Geronimo ever feared. He played a pivotal role in this long war for the desert Southwest from its beginning in 1861 until its end in 1890 with his pursuit of the renegade scout Apache Kid.

In this sprawling, monumental work, Paul Hutton unfolds over two decades of the last war for the West through the eyes of the men and women who lived it. This is Mickey Free's story but also the story of his contemporaries: the great Apache leaders Mangas Coloradas, Cochise, and Victorio; the soldiers Kit Carson, O. O. Howard, George Crook, and Nelson Miles; the scouts and frontiersmen Al Sieber, Tom Horn, Tom Jeffords, and Texas John Slaughter; the great White Mountain scout Alchesay and the Apache female warrior Lozen; the fierce Apache warrior Geronimo; and the Apache Kid. These lives shaped the violent history of the deserts and mountains of the Southwestern borderlands - a bleak and unforgiving world where a people would make a final, bloody stand against an American war machine bent on their destruction.

©2016 Paul Andrew Hutton. Recorded by arrangement with Crown, an imprint of Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc. (P)2016 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

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Ruined by the Narrator

Any additional comments?

The narrator is too emotive, and it's always an upbeat or cheery emotion, which just doesn't sound right when reading about women and children being slaughtered or captives being tortured. He sounds like Casey Kasem. I kept expecting to hear the American Top 40 jingle. I still want to learn more about the Apache Wars. My perusal of the reviews on Amazon makes me think that this is probably the most comprehensive and well-researched book on the wars, so I will probably buy the Kindle version at some point.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Worth listening to. Very detailed.

The author obviously did his homework. It is nice to find a book on Native History without an agenda. Simply factual and extremely detailed.

14 of 17 people found this review helpful

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Optional Heading

Great book, well worth the time spent to listen. The character development was insightful and engaging. The author presented a well-balanced view of the motivations and miscommunications between the Whites and Indians.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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To be injested with Mescal

A little dry but nonetheless informative and interesting narrative describing a tumultuous window of time in which striking characters of an ancient culture battled with Manifest Destiny.

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

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Very Good Read For Historic Prospective

The book started off slow but evidently turned a corner and became very interesting. History does not paint a favorable picture of the Apache, or the United States governments’ treatment of the Apache. The book is not intended to demean the Apache but to view the Indian tribe through the eyes perceived as truthful by a historian. At no point in this book did I consider that the author held any contempt of the Apache or any admiration for them either. The author depicts the Apache as a savage band of renegades who waged war on white eyes or the Europeans who settled in America and the Mexicans. Apache was a name that another tribe referred to the warriors as which meant ‘enemy’ in their native tongue. It was a name that depicted them well as they wagged war on anyone that was not Apache. They showed no mercy in their attacks killing European women and children as the men left to provide food for their families. They showed no mercy as they attacked the Mexicans killing in the same fashion. They show no mercy on other Indian tribes. The Apaches were merciless. The book was interesting and well worth the read. It was more than just a novelty to view Micky Free, Geronimo and the Apache Kid as more that just legendary warriors. It was suspenseful to try to visualize the Apache woman know as Beauty by the soldiers at Fort Apache and also the beauty that was the wife of The Apache Kid. It was heart wrenching to read about the girl, Apache May, and the fire that caused her death then to look up the photograph of her taken at Tombstone. And the books ended in such a fitting epilog as it fast tracked though the deaths of the characters on both sides of the Apache Wars until The Apache Kid faded away into the analogs of legendary status with only speculation of his death. With that the book faded away the words and concluded its pages.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Outstanding Account

This is without a doubt one of the best books I have listened to. The narration complimented the in depth research and story telling ability of the author.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Amazing history

This book was just what I needed. It was the full encounter and background I needed to understand all the family stories I heard as a child

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Superb

Difficult to put down! I felt as if I was transported into a time machine.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Good - but a bit unfocused...

At times the book tends to lose it's way - spending too much time talking about the details when the bigger picture might be better understood by taking a step back from the plight of a westerner or Indian family...

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Needs another narrator!

The time and events written about in this book are both interesting (and sad). But, boy! I wish the narrator had found out how to pronounce the words contained in it. As someone who lives near both the Bosque Redondo and the Mescalero Apache Reservation, I find myself cringing a whole lot as I listen.