Regular price: $20.97

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

From the acclaimed author of Einstein's Dreams, an inspired, lyrical meditation on religion and science, with an exploration of the tension between our yearning for permanence and certainty versus modern scientific discoveries pointing to the impermanent and uncertain nature of the world 

As a physicist, Alan Lightman has always held a purely scientific view of the world. Even as a teenager, experimenting in his own laboratory, he was impressed by the logic and materiality of the universe, which is governed by a small number of disembodied forces and laws. Those laws decree that all things in the world are material and impermanent. But one summer evening, while looking at the stars from a small boat at sea, Lightman was overcome by the overwhelming sensation that he was merging with something larger than himself - a grand and eternal unity, a hint of something absolute and immaterial. 

Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine is the result of these seemingly contradictory impulses, written as an extended meditation on an island in Maine, where Lightman and his wife spend their summers. Framing the dialogue between religion and science as a contrast between absolutes and relatives, Lightman explores our human quest for truth and meaning and the different methods of religion and science in that quest. Along the way, he draws from sources ranging from St. Augustine's conception of absolute truth to Einstein's relativity, from a belief in the divine and eternal nature of stars to their discovered materiality and mortality, from the unity of the once indivisible atom to the multiplicity of subatomic particles and the recent notion of multiple universes. 

What emerges is not only an understanding of the encounter between science and religion but also a profound exploration of the complexity of human existence. 

©2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc. (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    9
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I've been looking for this book all my life.

I think I may turn around and listen to this book again... right now.
I had my mind blown, more than one time.
The narrator was absolute perfection (which is difficult for me on most occasions).
I've been searching for God in religions all of my adult life. Most recently, and especially after reading this book, I now know that's not where you find God.
Thank you Alan Lightman.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Terrible! A major physicist becomes an amateur philosopher

Ramblings of a person seemingly lost in the universe attempts to build an existential structure based on insights gathered on an island where he vacations. Result is close to what a high school student might produce in response to his various sub-topics, such as Humans, Death, permanence; Ants(?) etc. ingenious, sincere, maybe. But completely hollow of any real substance. Plenty more current books that deal far better with these subjects.