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Publisher's Summary

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Paris Echo by Sebastian Faulks.

Here is Paris as you have never seen it before - a city in which every building seems to hold the echo of an unacknowledged past, the shadows of Vichy and Algeria. 

American postdoctoral researcher Hannah and runaway Moroccan teenager Tariq have little in common, yet both are susceptible to the daylight ghosts of Paris. Hannah listens to the extraordinary witness of women who were present under the German Occupation; in her desire to understand their lives and through them her own, she finds a city bursting with clues and connections. Out in the migrant suburbs, Tariq is searching for a mother he barely knew. For him in his innocence each boulevard, Métro station and street corner is a source of surprise. 

In this urgent and deeply moving novel, Faulks deals with questions of empire, grievance and identity. With great originality and a dark humour, Paris Echo asks how much we really need to know if we are to live a valuable life. 

©2018 Sebastian Faulks (P)2018 Random House Audiobooks

Critic Reviews

"Faulks is beyond doubt a master." (Financial Times)

"Faulks captures the voice of a century." (Sunday Times)

"The most impressive novelist of his generation." (Sunday Telegraph)

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Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-22-18

Listen very carefully as I shall say zis only wuns

The author's voice jars with the inexplicable pronunciation of the readers. Seems like the text was sent to two random people along with a dictaphone and no other instructions than to send it back the results asap. The rendering of the archived recordings reminded me of Allo Allo! I kept asking myself if I was missing some obvious rationale for this approach. The subject matter includes a re wash of the dirty laundry previously done in Charlotte Gray with a few of France's more recently soiled garments chucked in to make up a full load!


10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-20-18

Terrible narrators

I had to enter a star for story in order to be able to post a review. But I made it through only the first two chapters because the narrators (who seem to alternate chapters) are truly terrible. The man mumbles, and the woman sounds like she's reading rather than speaking. I'm a big fan of Sebastian Faulks and may come back to this book, but for now I've got the new ones by William Boyd and Kate Atkinson, both of which appear to have excellent narrators.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Mark
  • 10-04-18

Paris Past and Present

I really wanted to enjoy this book as Faulks is such a great writer and I was initially feeling a bit underwhelmed but realised there was no point looking for what was not there ie it is not a thriller so don't look for thrills, there is no jeopardy so don't look for rescue etc. What it is though is a very finely crafted look at the modern day immigrant experience from a certain perspective and a moving account of Paris during the occupation as recalled by an American researcher. How these two lives intertwine is interesting but the most fascinating part for me was the account of a particular Nazi concentration camp on French soil. That really moved me. There was also character dialogue about happy endings being something of a modern cliche but I'm not going to give anything away so you'll have to read or listen to find out where Faulks leaves our characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Matt
  • 11-07-18

Poor casting, poor production

I’m a huge fan of Faulks but struggled to get more than a few chapters into this appalling production. Why on earth Ehsas has been chosen to read as a Morocan teenager I cannot imagine - it’s like deciding someone with a strong Scots accent will portray a Chinese narrator perfectly. At least his chapters are reasonably well produced though - McBride sounds like she’s reading in a bathroom, and her consistently inconsistent French pronunciations drive one insane - either the character is familiar with a word or not; choosing to pronounce Place or Boulevard wrong consistently is one thing, but just every now and again smacks of poor preparation and a producer who just doesn’t care. You can also constantly hear movement of clothes or paper during her sections, as well as dreadful reverb. I expect better from Random House.

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  • Philip Shaw
  • 10-03-18

Good story, lots of in depth info

About France and Algerian relationship. I loved the personal memoirs from the parisien women during ww2

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 09-29-18

A snapshot in time rather than a story

As the final chapter approached I realised that there would not be a satisfactory ending and it was hugely disappointing. The characters meet and you get a snapshot of their ‘moment in time’ but don’t expect a story. You can imagine their future or let them go. Not my cup of tea but nicely written just felt a little self indulgent.

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  • margaret macintyre
  • 09-28-18

<br />Ordinary lives, beautifully told.<br /><br />

This is by far the best Sebastian Faulkes book since Bird Song. Beautifully narrated, listening to the brilliant narrators let me picture events so much better than reading the text. Thoroughly recommend this book

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  • Dog Ranger
  • 09-20-18

Loved it but not sure why

The Spectator’s review puts it better than I ever could. I never warmed to Hannah but, was cheering on Tariq. Loved the wartime content that Faulkes does so well.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 10-30-18

for lovers of Paris

loved the sense of place, the alternate voices, the storyline and the mix of characters cultures.

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  • Dr Jean C Emmanuel
  • 10-04-18

An excellent story well narrated

The 2 readers transport the listener with hours of relaxed enjoyment through to the end

The descriptive narrative paints a picture of present day Paris and evokes memories of past events, which need to be retold and reinforced for all listeners, especially the younger listeners.

Well worth down loading and listening to. Highly recommended.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful