Prime logo Prime members: New to Audible?
Get 2 free audiobooks during trial.
Pick 1 audiobook a month from our unmatched collection.
Listen all you want to thousands of included audiobooks, Originals, and podcasts.
Access exclusive sales and deals.
Premium Plus auto-renews for $14.95/mo after 30 days. Cancel anytime.
Nausea (New Directions Paperbook)  By  cover art

Nausea (New Directions Paperbook)

By: Jean-Paul Sartre
Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $17.99

Buy for $17.99

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's summary

Sartre's greatest novel and existentialism's key text, now introduced by James Wood, and read by the inimitable Edoardo Ballerini.

Nausea is the story of Antoine Roquentin, a French writer who is horrified at his own existence. In impressionistic, diary form, he ruthlessly catalogs his every feeling and sensation. His thoughts culminate in a pervasive, overpowering feeling of nausea which “spreads at the bottom of the viscous puddle, at the bottom of our time the time of purple suspenders and broken chair seats; it is made of wide, soft instants, spreading at the edge, like an oil stain.”

Winner of the 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature (though he declined to accept it), Jean-Paul Sartre, philosopher, critic, novelist, and dramatist, holds a position of singular eminence in the world of French letters. La Nausée, his first and best novel, is a landmark in existential fiction and a key work of the 20th century.

©1938, 1964, 2000 Editions Gallimard, New Directions Publishing Corp.,James Wood, Richard Howard (P)2021 New Directions Publishing Corp.

What listeners say about Nausea (New Directions Paperbook)

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    112
  • 4 Stars
    41
  • 3 Stars
    11
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    2
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    119
  • 4 Stars
    28
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    94
  • 4 Stars
    38
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Glad to have existed to enjoy reading this book!

Read this book for the 2nd time, and I’m grateful to have done so.

Recommended to anyone who wants to enjoy and learn from a thoughtful and deep philosophical work. The book is a bit depressing (not a surprise) but exciting at the same time. A mix of greatness (philosophy, feeling, deep thinking, and an indirect guide on existentialism).

The book (or existentialism in general) was necessary to reduce the bad effects of an inflamed ego, which deeply affected humanity after the industrial advancement back then. We need to have Nausea “reincarnated” to reduce the affects of a more inflamed ego humanity suffers from now after social media (aka antisocial media).

The narrator is great!

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Thank you Sartre...

📚 📚 📚
·Glow Kids: How Screen Addiction Is Hijacking Our Kids - and How to Break the Trance - Nicholas Kardaras

·The Invisible Rainbow: A History of Electricity and Life - Arthur Firstenberg

·Faucian Bargain: The Most Powerful and Dangerous Bureaucrat in American History - Steve Deace & Todd Erzen

·Dirty Electricity: Electrification and the Diseases of Civilization - Samuel Milham, MD, MPH

·Zapped: Why Your Cell Phone Shouldn't Be Your Alarm Clock & 1,268 Ways to Outsmart the Hazards of Electronic Pollution - Anne Louise Gittleman

·Are Wireless Devices Safe? - Jeanice Barcelo

·The Spinning Magnet: The Force That Created the Modern World – and Could Destroy It by Alanna Mitchell

·Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron Lanier

·Crystallizing Public Opinion by Edward Bernays

·The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind by Gustave Le Bon

·About behaviorism by B. F. Skinner

·The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

·The Dangers of 5G by Claudia Drake

·Radiation Nation: The Fallout of Modern Technology by Daniel T. DeBaun and Ryan P. DeBaun

·Cancer and EMF Radiation: How to Protect Yourself from the Silent Carcinogen of Electropollution by Brandon LaGreca

·Disconnect: The Truth about Mobile-phone Radiation, what the Industry Has Done to Hide It, and how to Protect Your Family by Devra Davis

·Hidden Dangers 5G: How Governments, Telecom and Electric Power Utilities Suppress the Truth about the Known Hazards of Electro-magnetic Field Radiation by Jerry G. Flynn

·EMF*D: 5G, Wi-Fi & Cell Phones: Hidden Harms and How to Protect Yourself by Joseph Mercola

·Death by 5G: An Advanced Guide to Population Reduction Techniques by Louise Steele

·Earthing: The Most Important Health Discovery Ever? By Clinton Ober, Martin Zucker, and Stephen Sinatra

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A great old book

It is nice to get to listen to this great old book performed by a professional reader.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Sarte is no Camus

Sarte takes himself as an all to serious exiistiainlist......too obvious ....I have no doubt why this work was never considered a great work in contrast to Camus "The Stranger" ...not impressed

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Snooze fest

I was excited to read this classic, especially after listening to James Wood intro. Wood's intro was a spoiler alert of sorts and discussed most of the philosophical queries in the novel. To me the novel didn't expand much beyond the intro; I wanted to quit listening half way through when it seemed Roquentin (the main character) was mainly just depressed and lonely as all he talked about was what he was witnessing day to day and how those people were living miserable, shallow lives. I appreciated the brief philosophical thoughts, but those seemed brief and a bit repetitive. The beginning and end were my favorite, with the middle being a snooze fest. Although I know this is a classic and I think it would bring about a great discussion with peers.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Should have read this 10 years ago

I've never taken existentialism seriously, and I still think it's not really a philosophy. But after listening to Nausea, I realized that Sarte and his contemporary existentialists articulated something profound about the experience of being human. The feelings are real, the ideas resonate, and Nausea is an excellent want to see that.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Immediately restarted after 1st listening

Wonderfully performed reading of an instant favorite. Best three week existential crisis I've ever had.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant beyond words

This was written in 1938. Life is funny. The fact that I just decided to read this now, at this moment in my life, proves how strangely we seem to find and connect with Art when we need it most.

The profundity of this work is impossible to ignore. It attempts to capture so much of life's absurdity, and miraculously it nearly succeeds in its efforts on every front. I was wowed by the beauty of it, as it flowed like the river of thought inside my own head, and yet, like a stream of consciousness poem brought vividly to fruition.

So many statements seemed to leap out at me from the ether, to say, let this define the now.

I am in awe of this work. It's placed itself prominently in the essential building blocks of what I consider the best novels ever written. I loved it so much I consumed the majority of it twice in rapid succession. An incomparable masterpiece of language. Art distilled to one of its most fundamental elements. The search for meaning, and lasting relevance, in a temporary existence.

Simply unbelievable how deep and true every page of this sings to me.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Stunning and Inspiring

I want to listen to it again in my sleep so my consciousness can enjoy the pure genius of this book.

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A dizzying, immersive experience

This is an exceptional audiobook. Edoardo Ballerini’s performance is perfect for Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea. His choice of tone and rhythm fits the protagonist’s long winded existential crisis very well. There were moments where I was so absorbed in the narration that it seemed as if my own conscious monologue was replaced with Ballerini’s voice, which also speaks to the mindfulness in Sartre’s writing process.

However, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with the main points of Sartre’s essay Existentialism Is A Humanism, before listening to this audiobook. This will help familiarize yourself with the concepts that Sartre is conveying through this novel as a medium, such as existential anguish and dread, but this is an enthralling experience regardless, and I think the writing stands on its own. This audiobook is truly an immersion into the protagonist’s “naseau.”

Something went wrong. Please try again in a few minutes.

You voted on this review!

You reported this review!