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Publisher's Summary

A lawyer with a growing stockpile of securities in the bank, three beautiful children, a compliant and decorative wife, and a lovely house in the suburbs, Walter Bridge has achieved all that is expected of someone of his race and background. But try as he might to control the lives of those around him, they prove perversely independent. In Mr. Bridge and its companion, Mrs. Bridge, Evan S. Connell has brilliantly realized the lives of upper-middle-class Americans living in the years just before and during World War II.

©1969 Evan S. Connell (P)1991 Recorded Books, LLC

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Exceptional!

Absolutely one of the most brilliant books I have ever read. Subtle yet sharp. Mr. Bridge spends his life worrying about various problems. My favorite problem is alcohol. He lives in the time of prohibition, a law he views as silly. He does not even have to justify his drinking, because of course it is a stupid law. He even convinced his black housekeeper to drink, despite her lack of desire and despite the law banning alcohol. At the same time he obsesses about how others behave incorrectly. Why are they breaking laws or social norms? For example, why do black people (who of course he likes. After all, he is no racist!) have to shake things up by trying to join an all white sorority?

Though written in 1969, this book of manners, concerns, and proper signaling-- according to Walter Bridge- is quite relevant to current times and could have been written today. A+

3 of 3 people found this review helpful