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Mania and Marjorie Diehl-Armstrong

Inside the Mind of a Female Serial Killer
Narrated by: Paul Heitsch
Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
4 out of 5 stars (12 ratings)

Regular price: $27.99

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Publisher's Summary

Marjorie Diehl-Armstrong, as one judge described her, as "a coldly calculated criminal recidivist and serial killer." She had experienced a lifetime of murder, mayhem, and mental illness. She killed two boyfriends, including one whose body was stuffed in a freezer. And she was convicted in one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's strangest cases: the Pizza Bomber case, in which a pizza deliveryman died when a bomb locked to his neck exploded after he robbed a bank in 2003 near Erie, Pennsylvania, Diehl-Armstrong's hometown.

Diehl-Armstrong's life unfolded in an enthralling portrait; a fascinating interplay between mental illness and the law. As a female serial killer, Marjorie Diehl-Armstrong was in a rare category. In the early 1970s, she was a high-achieving graduate student pursuing a career in education but suffered from bipolar disorder. Before her death, she was sentenced to serve life plus 30 years in federal prison.

©2017 Rowman & Littlefield (P)2017 Tantor

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Weighted down with theory

I could not get through this book despite several tries, because the story us interrupted by almost-full chapters of discussion on psychiatric research. The authors tell us about the history of mania, bipolar disorder, depression, hoarding, the city where Diehl was born, and on and on, dropping any threads that might tie together a narrative until I just gave up. She's definitely an interesting subject, and do is psychiatry. but a book has to confidently lead us to some conclusion, or, lacking one, stick to a narrative. This book does neither, leading me to believe that these authors didn't really have anything to say, but the publisher wanted to make some hay off the recent documentary. Too bad.