• Investing: Beginners Book to Learn the Most Important Thing About Investor’s Mind and Master the Game of Finance With Rental Property Investing, Stock Market, Mutual Funds, and Earn Passive Income Money

  • By: Brandon Marks
  • Narrated by: William Bahl
  • Length: 3 hrs and 26 mins
  • 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Publisher's Summary

Are you exhausted living paycheck to paycheck and not having the lifestyle you want?

If you are new to the world of investing, this book is the only guide you’ll ever need. It is a descriptive guide that will ensure that you are equipped with all of the knowledge you need to start out strong. As long as you are armed with valuable knowledge and understanding, you can be certain that you will become a strong investor and that you will surely reach your financial goals.

In this guide, we will talk about how you can start investing for your future financial goals so that you can enjoy the life of the rich in the future. You are a few minutes away from reaching financial freedom. Now is the time to take action.

Let this investing for beginners guide pave the way on your road toward financial freedom.

Here is a quick preview of what's inside....

  • Saving and investing types.
  • Stock market technical analysis.
  • Rental properties.
  • Portfolio management.
  • Mistakes.
  • And much more.

You’re already on the first step: Know why making an investment is vital. Strategic investments can develop your cash over the long time, and the sooner you begin, the more time you need to trip out the ebbs and flows of the stock marketplace as well as capitalize on the power of compound interest.

No more 9-5. No more trading time for money. No more rat race. That is what you will get if you put in the time and effort to become great at value investing. Building up your portfolio does not take as much time as you might think!

And another cool thing. You don’t need to start with much money.

The most important thing: take action!

©2019 Brandon Marks (P)2019 Brandon Marks

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An Excellent Intro for the New Investor

I am the worst kind of investor: emotion-driven, impulsive, and impatient; however, I am also realistic. I know that to make informed decisions regarding finances, I need to understand the basics. While no one book can address the full scope and breadth of any topic, Investing, by Brandon Marks, provides a beginner-friendly introduction to the myriad aspects and terminology of this multi-faceted field. From basic definitions of what it means to save versus to invest to pricing a rental property and navigating exchange traded funds, this book provides a simple, easy-to-follow primer.

Brandon Marks arms the reader with knowledge that allows him or her choose an area of investment to further research. He does not dig too deeply into the complexities of the field, remaining near enough to the surface so as to not scare away a reader new to the topic, but giving enough detail to permit a succinct introduction.

True to the title, Marks touches on numerous subjects. The importance of understanding the “investor’s mind” weaves through several chapters, with the recurring theme that emotion should remain out of decisions regarding investments. Emotions are a natural part of human reaction, and Marks states that the realization of either financial gains or losses can easily trigger an emotional response. While he notes that anxiety can “ruin your investment strategy,” he also says that same caution can be a benefit when ensuring the details of an investment are in order.

One of the longer chapters of the book, the section on rental properties introduces the types of properties to consider, necessary versus “can wait” upgrades and maintenance, and pricing strategies. Although the chapter presents some generalizations as to the types of renters that will be attracted to a certain type of property, Marks makes distinctions among the property types themselves, such as expected fees and associated startup costs.

The book touches lightly on the workings of the stock market, but clearly that is not the focus. Instead, Marks introduces investment strategies, technical analysis, and ways to avoid bad investments. These sections offer straightforward advice, such as avoiding technology stocks for which you have no background knowledge or for which you have not done a great deal of research, instead investing in areas in which you have some expertise to make sound judgments.

Keeping the information simple and straightforward works for this text. The chapter on mutual funds presents an overview of how the fund works, with key subjects being how an investor makes money and the plus and down sides to using professionally-managed funds. The chapter on choosing an investment company offers a short list and explanation of recommended companies with their accompanying rates per trade (dated January 2015). Although the numbers are several years old, there is value in seeing the comparisons.

This book is best suited to the newer investor or to one who may have invested previously but wishes to explore other potential areas. It is easy drown in the flood of information available on investing, and it is common to read pieces written using terminology that is more field-specific and less what the average investor needs to make an informed decision. This book does not fall into either of those categories, instead providing a general overview of information on a broad range of investment strategies to help guide a new investor toward a topic they may wish to further explore. The book is narrated by William Bahl in a simple, straightforward manner. His tone is even but with enough inflection that the material is easy to listen to and follow.

Overall, this book accomplishes what it sets out to do and is an excellent primer for people who are new to the investing world. I would recommend it to graduating high school seniors or those new to the workforce who have never had the opportunity to build investments and who may be considering the benefits of doing so.