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Publisher's Summary

Beginning with the story of Stephen from the book of Acts, considered the first Christian martyr, the drama builds to the passion of the early Church's persecution under the Roman Empire. The hardy and radical faith of those first believers spawned medieval missionary movements that spread the gospel across Europe and into England, Scotland, and Ireland. As the story continues, it places a significant emphasis on the sufferings of the early Protestants during the Reformation. As a vicar in the Church of England, author John Foxe strongly identified with the Protestant sects throughout Europe, and his loyalty to their cause comes through in his descriptions of many early clashes between Catholic and Protestant believers. Listeners are given an opportunity to experience the storytelling that incited several wars between Catholic and Protestant forces. The political and personal passion of the Reformation continues with the stories of the French Protestants during and after the French Revolution.
©2009 John Foxe (P)2004 christianaudio.com

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Stephen
  • Red Bluff, CA, United States
  • 08-11-10

How much pain can you take?

Great book, about people who were willing to be tortured to stay in God's will. Very inspiring, I hope to meet everyone of these people after I die. Excellent naration. Recommended :)

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Randol
  • San Joaquin, CA, USA
  • 05-19-10

a primer on humility

This is a quality recording of the Book of Martyrs. It is a hard story to listen to when considering the price that these folks paid to keep faith with Christ. I need to listen again and again

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Convicting the Christian

This book has truly opened my eyes to real suffering. I'm so glad I too the time to listen to it and will most likely listen and read it again. It has truly been a life changing book for me.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

The truth is not always pleasant but necessary.

This classic work of historical accounts of Christian martyrdom and sacrifices down Through the Ages is a must-read for those who wish to respect the history of their faith and acknowledge the possible atrocities capable from those influenced by evil in this world.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Not Fun, but Important

People who claim that they are persecuted in the United States should read this. Those who die for truth should not be mixed up with those inconvenienced for opinion.

The book was a little convoluted and the stories could have been told in a more compelling way. But while it is not a fun book, it is important to remember that truth is worth suffering for.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Fire and Brimstone Propaganda

The lasting effect of this book on history cannot be understated. It is the singlemost influential book on Protestant thinking throughout the Reformation, often read from the pulpit as scripture alongside the Bible, thus shaping that world irrevocably. The original clocked in at over a million words, and the woodcut illustrations cemented the horrors in the imaginations of the Tudor and Stuart world.

I am, unfortunately, not yet able to find a physical copy with reproductions of the illustrations for my home library, but in my quest to further deepen my appreciation for Medieval and Renaissance history, this audiobook found its way to me, filling my ears with the propaganda of the age in a most personal way. Regardless of your particular spiritual stance (I'm not a Christian myself), it's very difficult to not be moved to anger, sadness, and sometimes pride for the various sacrifices within, both noble and indignant. Listening to these accounts of martyrdom in detail opens the window of understanding to a bygone age and makes me readily appreciate the amount of religious freedom and tolerance I am accustomed to today by comparison. My studies into history and comparative religion are going to be forever changed by my experience of this book, such is the brutality and courage found here. At the end of the day, regardless of the bias and agenda of the author, these are still tales of human suffering, and it's inhuman to listen to such things impassively. As such, this book is a mental and spiritual beating. For a Christian, especially one of that time and place, I can only imagine the effect it would have on the devout. I'm sure it still holds some power with the faithful today who encounter it. As an outsider in a Christian culture and amateur historian, I appreciate it from my own perspectives and understandings, but it further reinforced my own beliefs about organized religion vs. personal spiritualism. I would liken this book to Yoda's cave on Dagobah: what's inside is shaped and perceived by what you take with you, and you will emerge from the experience with some inherent change on your psyche that you will need to come to terms with. It will not be an easy journey, and only you can decide if it's necessary for you to confront this tome. Make no mistake, it will be a confrontation.

8 of 13 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Historical facts and spiritual truths.

this audiobook was the best one I've ever listened to mainly for the content the reader did a fantastic job with such a gem of History and spiritual events. I hope this blesses you as you listen and understand what God's will is for your life...

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Harsh History

Learn from history or be doomed to repeat it! God will avenge the persecuted and martyred body of Christ...

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Great History to the Christian Faith

Much weeping to know those who paved the way for our freedom today. The narrator was precise with words and testimony.

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Essential read.

Remarkable accounts of the faithful standing on their belief. It's not so important what happens, but how we handle circumstances, and endure on the right side (the Kingdom of Light), till the end.

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  • Mary Carnegie
  • 10-10-17

A book of its time of historical significance

The attitudes of the Protestant and Anglican churches of post-Reformation Europe are clear in this comprehensive account of the persecutions of dissenters from the Catholic Church, first published in the 16th century when all was still raw and evolving.
There could be no question of an impartial account, unless an extraterrestrial historian had visited.
There are, of course, Catholic martyrologies of similar date, presenting a diametrically opposed version of events!
The interest is, in both cases, in understanding the mindset of that era in the words of that time - it’s generally not “fake news” in the case of a scholar like Foxe, or his Catholic counterparts, though that did exist, but a question of viewpoint and a large degree of selectivity - rather like the Daily Telegraph and The Guardian today.
As a Presbyterian turned Catholic, I tend to see both sides- not the brutality or intolerance, but the courage in affirming one’s faith.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful