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Publisher's Summary

"[Holter Graham] uses his deep, elastic voice to punctuate key ideas, and he speeds up and slows down to create tension...The result is a wonderful performance of a most important audiobook." — AudioFile Magazine

This program includes an author's note read by Michael Wolff

#1 New York Times Bestseller

With extraordinary access to the West Wing, Michael Wolff reveals what happened behind-the-scenes in the first nine months of the most controversial presidency of our time in Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.

Since Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, the country—and the world—has witnessed a stormy, outrageous, and absolutely mesmerizing presidential term that reflects the volatility and fierceness of the man elected Commander-in-Chief. 

This riveting and explosive account of Trump’s administration provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office, including:

  • What President Trump’s staff really thinks of him
  • What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama
  • Why FBI director James Comey was really fired
  • Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn’t be in the same room
  • Who is really directing the Trump administration’s strategy in the wake of Bannon’s firing
  • What the secret to communicating with Trump is
  • What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers

Never before in history has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Fire and Fury shows us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion.

©2018 Michael Wolff (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

Critic Reviews

"Holter Graham, a Baltimore native, actor and veteran audiobook narrator, delivers [this] truly bizarre tale of dysfunction in a composed voice. Where a less confident narrator might have allowed a smirking note to emerge, Graham maintains his poise, subtly picking up the narrative's mood in slight modulations of tone and unobtrusively freighted pauses." (Washington Post)  

"If you think that bomb cyclones are unique to the weather, then listening to this audiobook will change your mind. This literary perfect storm combines a book the president wants to ban with a narrator, Holter Graham, whose energy and vocal clarity add fuel to the author's incendiary words.... The result is a wonderful performance of a most important audiobook." (AudioFile)

Some of the most talked about moments from Fire and Fury:

Trump hoped to appoint business partner and confidant Tom Barrack as White House chief of staff.
Upon entering office, President Trump’s first orders of business were executive orders and immigration.
Once Ivanka and Jared Kushner joined the administration, they began to think towards the future.
The relationship between President Trump and Vladimir Putin was puzzling to many.
Jeff Sessions recused himself from the Russian investigation on the heels of a Washington Post story.
President Trump’s foreign policy views raised questions, particularly in response to chemical attacks in Syria.

Listening to:

  • Chapter 4
  • Trump hoped to appoint business partner and confidant Tom Barrack as White House chief of staff.
  • Chapter 6
  • Upon entering office, President Trump’s first orders of business were executive orders and immigration.
  • Chapter 7
  • Once Ivanka and Jared Kushner joined the administration, they began to think towards the future.
  • Chapter 9
  • The relationship between President Trump and Vladimir Putin was puzzling to many.
  • Chapter 11
  • Jeff Sessions recused himself from the Russian investigation on the heels of a Washington Post story.
  • Chapter 14
  • President Trump’s foreign policy views raised questions, particularly in response to chemical attacks in Syria.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    11,992
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    5,326
  • 3 Stars
    2,347
  • 2 Stars
    505
  • 1 Stars
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Performance

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    12,556
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  • 3 Stars
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  • 2 Stars
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  • 1 Stars
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Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • 4 Stars
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  • 3 Stars
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  • 2 Stars
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  • 1 Stars
    406
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not as credible as one would like.

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Probably not. When I began fact checking, I immediately found that the book exaggerated situations. While I am not a Trump fan, I don't want to be misled either. One example of misinformation is when the author discusses Trump's speech to the CIA. When I compared what the book reported to the entire speech on CNN, it was obvious that the book was editing out, and misrepresenting what was said.

Would you recommend Fire and Fury to your friends? Why or why not?

No, primarily because of the misrepresenting information. I prefer my journalism to be factual and allow me to make my own opinion.

Did Fire and Fury inspire you to do anything?

Be more diligent in fact checking.

Any additional comments?

Please leave the spin out of journalism, it's hard enough to get to the truth when people are being factual.

303 of 384 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Difficult to differentiate real from fake info

the author basically starts off the books saying although he's done so much research and interviewed a lot of people He is uncertain what parts of the book are real and fake and sometimes he will let the audience know and other times he leaves it up to the audience to determine. This is a mistake and significantly reduces The credibility of the book. It would have been better if the author had used his research to make an educated guess on what was going on rather than adding conjecture. Increased ambiguity on such an important issue is disappointing. having said that the narrator is top-notch.

212 of 278 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • VC
  • 01-21-18

Entertaining Yet Lacks Credibility

This book would have been so much better if the author was able to eliminate his own bias. I am by no means a Trump supporter, but many points in this book are discredited or provably false with simple observation or common sense. According to this book, Trump is a stumbling, bumbling idiot, who accidentally became president. That is painfully untrue. Whether he is delusional or not, Trump believes he will be/is a great President and it has been his goal to become so for years. To claim otherwise takes so much credibility away from this book, which is sad. It is sad because there are, what I am sure are many moments of truth in this book, but it is deluded by its dishonesty.

132 of 188 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

The power of marketing

If your news sources includes the WSJ, NYT and Washington Post, then you pretty much already have read much of what is written in this book. No doubt there is some exaggeration, but all in all, this book is a yawner. Had there not been so much political noise about this book, many people (myself included) would never have bought it. All in all, it was not very good.

43 of 62 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

A disappointment.

Most non-fiction comes in with hard facts & supports the initial premise as the book progresses. Sadly, a lot of hype prompted me to purchase this book. I kept yearning for something more substantive & less salacious.
<yawn>
This book was more commentary than investigative journalism. If you regularly keep informed about politics and policy, there is ZERO need to read/listen this book.

Anyone interested in good journalism should read “Dark Money!”

201 of 293 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

One sided emotion

Well, I got the book to get some insight into the Trump presidency but a few chapters in and it's hard to listen to. The narrator is the biggest problem. He speaks with obvious bias, contempt, and near rage at Trump's existence that I can barely pay attention to the content. The CONTENT! Well, if you hate Trump, you'll love this book.

Whatever. RETURNED.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Addictive

If this book were a Star Wars movie, Bannon would be Yoda. So keep in mind that you are reading what Bannon wants you to read. When being compared to Trump, it is easy for just about anyone to appear sane, intelligent, strategic, and competent, but the portrayal of Bannon laid it on a bit thick. I have no doubt Bannon was much smarter than Trump and saw things coming that Trump was too foolish and arrogant to understand. It's just that the book would have been much better if Bannon had been scrutinized as thoroughly as Trump.

Even with this aspect of the book, which sets the entire tone, it is a must read because along with the newly revealed speculations, it serves as an excellent biography of facts that have been long substantiated by the NYT, WP, as well as other reliable sources. Given the buzz around this author, I expected the book to be far less measured and far more sensational that it actually was. When speculating, the author made sure to say things like, "According to one side, the events played out like this."

The author began his biography of this presidency with the magic maneuvering of Roger Ailes and Steve Bannon who got someone as moronic as Trump elected and moved through to the daily seedy details of Trump's web of lies and deceit. You may have read all the articles in the NYT and WP in piecemeal but I doubt you have read it through from beginning to end in the way Wolff recounts.

If you can stand the Bannon slant, you will be rewarded with some deeply satisfying discussions on the following subjects:

- Why politics requires that you know politicians and how this affected Trumps political appointments. You might think Trump was guided by Russian involvement when looking at his top appointments. So many of his appointees had shady Russian ties (ties they lied about). However, even if Russia were actually fake news, it's not, Trump would have appointed strange and unqualified candidates anyway. The author laid out his convincing case for why. Even Ann Coulter had to step in and inform Trump, "No one is telling you, but you can't appoint your own children. You just can't."


- What was Trump's reaction to the media portrayal of him, which was unlike any president, republican or democratic, before him, and how did it affect his behavior. This section had speculation but it was convincing. You also get to learn about what Trump himself and his family thought of his surprise win.

- The meat of the book involves the firing of Comey. Who pushed for it? What was the real timeline and did the president even seem competent enough to make these choices? This is where Bannon really seemed like Yoda, but even as someone who hates Bannon, I found it hard not to agree when it came to this. Wolff looked at the roles of Ivanka, Jared, and especially Jared's father Charlie Kushner. What a tale Wolff had to tell. Of course there is a lot of speculation and denial surrounding all of this. Hopefully time will sort it out, even with the constant lying coming from the Trump camp. The best part of this section involved Wolff's retelling of the likely obstruction of justice that occurred on Air Force One before and after Ivanka sat in for Trump at G20.

- Trumps hatred for, "That cunt Sally Yates," and her role in taking him down as well as Rosenstein's big, "fuck you" to Trump by appointing Mueller.

- Trump really believes all news is fake news because he himself admitted to constantly generating false news. The only point of releasing any type of news, in Trump's view, is to manipulate the narrative. He cannot conceive of any other motive.

This book is probably a 4 star book. I am giving it five because this is the type of book that attracts trolls who will give it 1 star to keep people from reading it. Plus, it's an addictive page turner that you will probably blow through in 2 days or less. Couldn't put it down.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Colorful but stretches the actual quotes a bit far

The good: this is well-paced, and traces the events and personalities well. Some historical context and analysis is offered, such as practices of earlier presidents, compared to Trump's. These passages are well-crafted. Some of the rightist figures I found surprisingly interesting, such as Bannon and Ailes. The depictions here go beyond the two-dimensional cutouts offered in much popular press. The narration is superb. The book overall is a nice recap and update to the conversation. Keeping a fair distance from every last assertion this author makes, I do feel I am better educated on the history and players, having listened through this. Some of the fly-on-the-wall feel of being there came through well, though not all.
The bad: there is too much of a disembodied, unattributed, omniscient straw-person voice floating around explaining everything in the standard blue way, if a colorful and cleverly-phrased version of it. There are stretches where actual quotes would be more welcome (as small a sample as each might be anyway, to use the statisticians' term). The author's opening disclaimer too casually tries to dispel this deficiency. A bit more caution and care in the journalism would suit me.
Finally, I applaud this release as flushing out Trump, brandishing his lawyers' threats and his nondisclosure and non-disparagement agreements. It it is high time his straddling the public-private line and getting a free ride attempting to privatize the truth was tested in the courts. Not that I think he will follow through. His track record in such fights has been severely patchy as it is. Yet, he plunges forward, unable to resist rising to the bait. Ha!

136 of 209 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

a tale, Told by an idiot, full of sound & fury...

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing." - Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, 5


Presidential books are tricky things. Their sources, often D.C. professionals, use them to push agendas, knife enemies, or frame recent history in a way that makes them or their side look positive. The problem is Trump is surrounded by few if any competent professionals (especially during the first couple hundred days). While Michael Wolff is no The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama in his care and craft, he did happen to crawl into a White House (mainly pre-Kelly) that was unaware, or unprepared, for a bottom feeder like Michael Wolff. He wasn't a "wolf" in sheep's clothing in the White House, he was just a mutt willing to pick up everything that was dropped off the table, and there were plenty of scraps.

It reminds me a bit of Michael Hastings relationship with General McCrystal and his staff. Hanging around reporters and journalists is mostly a dangerous thing, especially if you are in politics. You often forget the guy next to you having beers is there doing a job that might not be in your best interest. You relax, and they smile, and they record everything you say. They aren't your friend. They are writing a story. They want juice. They aren't playing.

For style and accuracy, this book probably deserves 3-stars. It was written fast and loose. But for impact and balls, this book probably deserves 5-stars. I can't think of an equal to it that has come out in the first year of any president. But like everything with Trump, it will be consumed by the next crazy thing Trump tweets, or the next insult he throws, or DEAR GOD NO, the war he starts. Trump in the 21st century survives despite this type of book because there is always more and we have scarely enough time to deal with nuances of this week's crazy when the next crazy train pulls into the station.

Nobody in this book comes across very well. Most are accidental players (it often feels like the PRESIDENT is an accidental player), some are there because they really do think SOMEONE has to be there doing a job (but they keep enabling the crazy behavior of the President), some are family, and some are just opportunists. This is a group that is, by design and temperment, bound to eat each other. Michael Wolff just cooked the meal.

Bannon likes to reference Shakespeare (often when talking about Jared and Ivanka), and how things are not going to end well with the Trump administration. At the end of the Book, Wolff quoted Bannon that "it all threatened to make Shakespeare loo like Dr. Suess". One should note that Bannon's favorite Shakespeare play is Titus Andronicus. That Shakespeare play ended with canibalism. I think Bannon might be on to something. It appears the feast at the White House is just beginning.

55 of 86 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Everything we already knew, but in high-def detail

What made the experience of listening to Fire and Fury the most enjoyable?

It's the curtain-opening moment showing in great detail that the emperor not only has no clothes, but barely even understand he is emperor.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Fire and Fury?

The McDonalds Revelation

What about Michael Wolff and Holter Graham ’s performance did you like?

Wolff has recorded these conversations, so you can hear the distinctly Trumpesque or "Bannon-ese" nature of all quotes in the book.

Any additional comments?

It reads like fan fiction about the White House, which is great fun at first, but then you remember "this all actually happened", and it's a bit terrifying. We now have a clear, referenced exposé of how this so-called "draining the swamp" ironically consisted of dumping 1000s of tons of toxic waste right back in, then letting it sit stagnant because the Command-in-Chief doesn't even want to be there in the first place.

205 of 324 people found this review helpful