Audible Premium Plus

$14.95 a month

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $19.95

Buy for $19.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

A man like me takes what he wants when he wants it. 

Lacey wanted to find a sexy and irresistible man. She never thought she meet someone like Henry James. Henry James had a wicked smile and dazzling eyes. He was arrogant, handsome, teasing, and the sexiest man she's ever seen in her life.

The only problem was Henry James was everything she wasn't looking for in a man. He was too handsome. Too rich. Too alpha. He was the sort of man who could have Lacey doing what he wanted without her even knowing. He was the sort of man who had her doing things she never thought she’d do.

Plain and simple, Henry James was trouble, and Lacey wanted nothing to do with him. However, Henry had other plans, and the first of which was to get Lacey into his bed.

Falling for the Billionaire is a hot, sexy stand-alone audiobook.

©2017 J. S. Cooper (P)2018 J. S. Cooper

What listeners say about Falling for the Billionaire

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    14
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

I NEVER want my daughter to read this book!!!

I am OCD when it comes to books. I have to finish a book when I start one and that is the only reason I finished this book. This book promotes mental abuse on women. Thank god I don’t know a woman that would subject themselves to the BS that is in this book. I have enjoyed other series from this author but this series is crazy. And this book was the absolute worst. I have never wanted to throat punch anyone as much I wanted to throat punch Lacy in this book. I really don’t have to worry about my daughter reading this book cuz after the first chapter she would stop reading. Thank god.
. I have never given 1star to any book I have read or listened to. Mainly because I can’t write books and I know it’s got to be hard to do. I guess the joke is on me because audible got my $20 for this horrific book!!!

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

This. Was. The. Most. God. Awful. Book.

The entire series has been pretty bad. I only finished it because I hate not finishing books and series once I’ve started them. But this book was bad on a whole other level.

The female protagonist was PATHETIC! She had no backbone, no gumption, no self-esteem, and no self-respect. I feel stupider and shallower as a woman for having listened to it. (The rest of the review contains some minor spoilers.) Lacey supposedly falls inextricably in love with Henry very quickly, which I know is theoretically possible, but the man is a grade-A jerk with zero redeeming qualities. The only aspects of his being that she ever comments on are physical—he’s good looking and good in bed. She never describes anything deeper than surface-level attraction, and it is entirely incomprehensible what she could possibly love about a man who not only doesn’t share any part of his private life with her but who tells her repeatedly that he doesn’t want a relationship with her, they are not dating, he doesn’t do love, etc. Every time he pushes her away or she realizes that he doesn’t feel the same way about her that she feels about him, she resolves to stay away, but that only lasts about a minute before her undying love for him draws her back in. She is so desperate for him to love her back that her wishful thinking imbues everything he says with meaning that just isn’t there. That is, it isn’t there until the very last scene, two months after he definitively tells her that he doesn’t love her, when he flip flops and says that he actually loved her the whole time but was simply afraid of his feelings, which only serves to validate all her psychotic behavior up to that point.

This book's characterization of Henry, which actually started towards the end of the previous book, is completely at odds with how he was portrayed in the earlier books in the series. At first, he came across as a really nice guy, fairly normal, just with a large bank account. Here he is a horrible, womanizing jerk, and apparently none of the other characters from the earlier books actually knows him all that well.

Each of the books in the series has featured questionably legal sexual advances from the male protagonists (including sexual assault in the first book, statutory rape in the second book, and sexual harassment in the workplace in the third and fourth books). In this book, Henry purposely walks in on Lacey while she is changing, corners her when she tells him to leave, and proceeds to take off his own clothes amidst Lacey’s verbal protests. But despite her apparent attempts to get him to leave, her inner monologue reveals her deep attraction to him and mental conflict over how to react to his advances. This sort of psychological backtracking paints real victims of sexual harassment and sexual assault in a bad light. It makes it seem like “No” doesn’t necessarily mean “No,” and it’s okay for a guy to disregard the word if he believes that the woman is simply playing hard to get or that she will come around eventually. It is insulting and degrading to all women who depend upon their right to refuse unwanted sexual advances.

A much more minor complaint that actually dates back to the first book in the series but that only became particularly annoying in this book is Henry’s full name—Henry James—which Lacey uses over and over again instead of just referring to him by his first name as all the characters in the previous books did. Why would the authors give a character the same name as a famous and influential author if it didn’t have any sort of significance to the story at hand? The parallel isn’t even mentioned in any of the books in the series, and every time I heard Lacey say the name, all I could do was wonder why the authors did that. It was immensely distracting from the story.

The only good part of this installment in the series was that way fewer sentences ended with the phrase “as well.” It was pervasive in all the other books—as though the authors had never heard of “too,” “also,” “additionally,” “furthermore,” “moreover,” et al.—but, for whatever reason, it thankfully tapered off considerably in this book.

All in all, this book is a disgusting excuse for a “romance” novel, merely perpetuating chauvinistic and misogynistic views of women.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Lacey and Henry

"Falling for the Billionaire" (One Night Stand Book 5) by J.S. Cooper and Helen Cooper is a good story. I'd been looking forward to this story. I enjoyed parts of Lacey and Henry's story but was disappointed with others. This story has drama, passion, twists and turns, billionaires, and more. I wish there had been more romance, passion, humor, love, and less of the drama. I did enjoy getting to catch up a little with the other characters from the One Night Stand Series. Recommend to fans of drama, billionaires, and series.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Repetitive

The story was boring because the author just kept repeating the same thing. Nothing I would recommend to anyone