Regular price: $28.00

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

An examination of a world increasingly defined by disorder and a United States unable to shape the world in its image, from the president of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Things fall apart; the center cannot hold. The rules, policies, and institutions that have guided the world since World War II have largely run their course. Respect for sovereignty alone cannot uphold order in an age defined by global challenges from terrorism and the spread of nuclear weapons to climate change and cyberspace. Meanwhile, great power rivalry is returning. Weak states pose problems just as confounding as strong ones. The United States remains the world's strongest country, but American foreign policy has at times made matters worse, both by what the US has done and by what it has failed to do. The Middle East is in chaos; Asia is threatened by China's rise and a reckless North Korea; and Europe, for decades the world's most stable region, is now anything but. The unexpected vote for "Brexit" signals that many in modern democracies reject important aspects of globalization, including borders open to trade and immigrants.

In A World in Disarray, Richard Haass argues for an updated global operating system - call it world order 2.0 - that reflects the reality that power is widely distributed and that borders count for less. One critical element of this adjustment will be adopting a new approach to sovereignty, one that embraces its obligations and responsibilities as well as its rights and protections. Haass also details how the US should act toward China and Russia as well as in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. He suggests, too, what the country should do to address its dysfunctional politics, mounting debt, and lack of agreement on the nature of its relationship with the world.

A World in Disarray is a wise examination, one rich in history, of the current world along with how we got here and what needs doing. Haass shows that the world cannot have stability or prosperity without the United States, but the United States cannot be a force for global stability and prosperity without its politicians and citizens reaching a new understanding.

©2017 Richard Haass (P)2017 Penguin Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    227
  • 4 Stars
    134
  • 3 Stars
    51
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    7

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    196
  • 4 Stars
    111
  • 3 Stars
    53
  • 2 Stars
    13
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    200
  • 4 Stars
    101
  • 3 Stars
    58
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    6
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I look at the world politic and how we got here

oh well narrated and interesting look at World politics and how we got here. didn't agree with all of his analysis and solutions . but good discussion points

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

An interesting summary of the "Establishment" POV

This is required reading for anyone looking to understand geopolitics, because it represents one of the foundations of the discipline - how the game is played by those who are in it. Haass is very much the "Establishment". You need to temper this perspective by reading other authors, and also those from disciplines such as international law and human rights, economics and development.

The book can basically be categorised into two halves - introduction and basics of foreign policy, which many readers will be familiar with, but is a good place to start for beginners (as long as you temper it with other POVs). The second half is Haass' own theory for how international relations should develop in a globalised future - under, of course, the kind and fatherly eye of the USA.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Bais propaganda

Bais propaganda advacating trickery deception and "kill the weak". Well, a German leader thought the same in late 30s and early 40s. No symathy millians buchered thousands of miles away.
Do not waste your money just buy many routine papers you will get the same . With this type of mentality of leaders or advisers God help us.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Well Done

This book did a fine job in regards to giving an overview of the history of world order, as well as analyzing the world order of today. Richard Haas spends considerable time on North Korea and Chinese relations, while also including analysis of threats such as nuclear proliferation, climate change, the collapse of the world financial system, and isolationism. If the reader is looking for deep and thorough insight into threats such as Russia, ISIS, or Chinese aggressiveness in the East and South China Sea, I would say this is not the best read for you. Moreover, this book seems to focus more on "big picture" and overall policy rather than minute details. That said, this is still a fantastic book which I would confidently recommend.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A difficult yet interesting book

I appreciate the structure of the book. However for the amount of content, I wish the language used was made the book more accessible. Getting through the book took a while. Perhaps I was not the intended audience.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Informative. Left me optimistic and pessimistic

Where does A World in Disarray rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Fairly high in my nonfiction list. The narration was clear and informative. The author describes the complexity of the world very well and suggests some reasonable policy prescriptions that are thought provoking but unattainable in our current broken political system.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Left me pessimistic.

Have you listened to any of Dan Woren and Richard Haass ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

The fundamental need for an informed electorate is essential for progress in the future.

Any additional comments?

Mr. Haass is obviously well qualified to address the issues covered in this book. I found the book generally thought provoking and apolitical. I may buy the earlier book he wrote on our domestic issues.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Really interesting and well written.

I learned a lot, how ever some was above me. Overall it comes off as very fair, objective, and insightful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Timely

This book was easy to follow and informative. Mr Haas makes an excellent case for Informed actions for US as participants in global society, economy and culture. Voters should be educated in the US involvement in the world. Isolation is impractical and harmful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Disorganized, repeating

Content kept repeating itself. The hisotry narrative is disorganized, cant find its chain of logic. Im sure there is a better way to convey the 8 hr long book in 2 hr.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Quite a lot to cover

A solid breakdown of many of the pressing issues, challenges, and perhaps opportunities that lay in front of the the US leadership and public in the years ahead.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • MR K Hayes
  • 06-23-17

Didn't feel I read too many new incites

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I don't feel I learned much that was new

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

HIs ideas on what the USA should do next which was mostly the opposite of the Trump agenda

What does Richard Haass and Dan Woren bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

not sure what this question means.

Could you see A World in Disarray being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

No

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Chong Beng Lim
  • 03-30-17

An illuminating book about the state of the world

This books explains about the past, current, and possible future of the world. It has a wealth of illuminating and minute details of the world. The author is eminently experienced in foreign policy of the U.S.

However, the information provided is biased towards the US as the centre of the word. Not everyone would think this way. It's a great book to possess if you don't harbour any hatred against the country

Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Mr. G. Trabakoulas
  • 07-22-17

Giorgis

it was very biased unfortunately. Obvuoius failures of the Republicans where glossed over and the opposite emphasized. Democratic successes start on a positive and end with criticism, Republican start with criticism and end with apologies or praise.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Michelle
  • 02-07-17

why did haas bother?

unbearably pedestrian
rehashing well known stuff in a boring way
bureaucratic English, turgid...
to be avoided. The facts in the early chapters have been reported elsewhere, better. I don't know about the later chapters as I gave up.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful