Regular price: $27.99

Membership details Membership details
  • 30 days of membership free, plus 1 audiobook and 2 Audible Originals to get you started.
  • After trial, you'll get 3 titles each month: 1 audiobook and 2 Audible Originals of your choice.
  • Don't like your audiobook? Swap it for free.
  • Cancel anytime and keep your audiobooks.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
  • Get access to the Member Daily Deal
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

A seemingly impossible mystery tests the keen mind and forensic skills of Joanna Blalock, the daughter of Sherlock Holmes and the heir to his unique talent for deduction, from USA Today best-selling author Leonard Goldberg. 

The following case has not previously been disclosed to the public due to the sensitive information on foreign affairs. All those involved were previously bound by the Official Secrets Act. With the passage of time and the onset of the Great War, these impediments have been removed and the story can now be safely told. 

When an executed original of a secret treaty between England and France, known as the French Treaty, is stolen from the country estate of Lord Halifax, Scotland Yard asks Joanna, Dr. John Watson, Jr., and Dr. John Watson, Sr., to use their detective skills to participate in the hunt for the missing treaty. As the government becomes more restless to find the missing document and traditional investigative means fail to turn up the culprit, Joanna is forced to devise a clever plan to trap the thief and recover the missing treaty. 

Told from the point of view of Dr. John Watson, Jr., in a style similar to the original Sherlock Holmes stories, A Study in Treason is based partly on facts in our world and partly on the facts left to us by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  

A Study in Treason is the perfect audiobook for fans of Sherlock Holmes.

©2018 Leonard Goldberg (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    227
  • 4 Stars
    96
  • 3 Stars
    31
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    239
  • 4 Stars
    62
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    184
  • 4 Stars
    94
  • 3 Stars
    34
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    5
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great performance- Easy to Solve Case

Steve West is a master storyteller. The multitude of voices he portrayed takes a very high level of talent. There were clues early on that helped me guess the ending, but it was still enjoyable. I found myself becoming anxious for the characters and cheering on Holmes and Watson(s) as they unraveled the mystery. Definitely worth the credit. The only thing keeping me from giving it 5 stars is the hints make it too easy to guess the traitor’s name.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A study in Q & A

I was really looking forward to this 2nd book in the series. Unfortunately I ended up disappointed.While the story took many twists and turns, the style in which it was told eventually wore on my nerves. Much of the book was an unending Q and A with Joanna and both of the Watsons. They asked and she answered displaying her amazing deductive powers over and over and over. Hopefully in the next book, there can be more of a natural discovery of her abilities throughout the storyline.

16 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Jean
  • Dubai, United Arab Emirates
  • 09-19-18

Disappointing

Excellent narrator - very skilled. However, most of the story seems to consist of the main character, Joanna, being told how clever she is and everyone fawning over her, and she responding by being smug. It would have been much more engaging just to see her demonstrate her skills instead of endlessly talking about them. It got a bit tiresome. The original Holmes stories did a bit of that, but in a much more light-handed and nuanced way. This can't compare. Also, there is too much Doyle-derivative material. I'll usually read anything in the Holmes-verse but I won't be reading anymore of this series.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Not good

I read all the Sherlock-inspired literature but this one had a plot derivative of The Second Stain, made the Watsons out to be unbelievably slow for two doctors, and had wooden dialogue that was really hard to listen to. I recommend skipping this one.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

a story in ignorance

I listened to the whole thing but almost stopped when the supposedly brilliant and well educated Ms. Blaylock proved as ignorant of history as a millennial. She said that the country house where the theft of the Naval Treaty took place was built in 1690 on a grant of land given by Charles II (died 1685, succeeded by James II who was deposed in the Glorious Revollution of 1688. Well the grant may have happened before charles II's death and the house built in 1690, but the owners could hardly have been hidding from ax happy Charles II since he was dead and not known for chopping off heads in the first place. William III was king in 1690. Clearly the author does not know or care about history much. It is not as if he got some medieval Edward mixed up with another in a passing reference. The Glorious Revolution and the kings since Charles I who was aquanted with the wrong side of the ax until the modern history of Britan began with William and the agreement of the ruling classes not to judicially murder their opposition as long as they refrained from actual treason are important.
Shame on you Mr. Author, for not checking wikipedia at least.
Otherwise, the story though derivative in the extreme, was intriguing and free from brutal violence on-stage. Good nonsense to de-stress on.

18 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Boring.

I love Sherlock Holmes stories and the first book in this series was entertaining albeit a little dry. This book was downright painful to get through. So many bare characters and clues that keep you in the dark until Holmes *deigns* to elaborate at the end. Meh. Finished it but only because I held out hope that it would get better.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

This author needs a better editor

The stories of the daughter of Sherlock Holmes are decently written in general. Goldberg tries to script them in a similar fashion to the originals by Arthur Conan Doyle. However, his editor does him no justice by allowing the word “elucidated” to be used so many times (8? 12? We get it. You have a thesaurus.) nor the overuse of the Holmesian tropes like “the game is afoot”, “do you have your service revolver”, etc. Goldberg is a decent writer. He should rely more on his own skill, and less on these tired phrases.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Love this series

I am always surprised at the solutions to mysteries. Thought I had it figured by chapter 2 but there was a twist. Im a big Sherlock fan so this series is a treat!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Listen & Great Narrative Pace!!!!!

Great Narration, reading was extremely well paced and all characters were distinguishable audibly without effort , never leaving me wondering, "now which character is this"? A Sherlockian mysteru, through and through! Could not have requested a better written mystery in the great Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's multi - layered Style. Had a GREAT TIME listening while driving throughout the city, kept boredom at Bay to say the very least . another great aspect of this particular listen was the fact that the narrative was chock-full of information yet on the other hand could be stopped while I conducted my work and started again when I was through multiple times throughout the day and nothing was ever Ami's or confusing or even needed to be listen to a second time in order for me to catch up!!!! All in all a great book a great narrator and definitely a credit well-used!!!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

A Sir Arthur Conan Doyle he is not ...

... obviously since Leonard S. Goldberg is from South Carolina. And herein lies part of the problem.
Everytime an American writes a book set in England or vice versa I become wary. Both countries may share the same language but in many respects that's where the similarities end. Granted Mr Goldberg has made a tremendous effort. Too much effort in fact. Using many British idioms and trying to immitate everything that makes a book inherently British does not work though - for me at least. It all sounds a bit forced. Too formal, too eloquent, too much simply. It is what it is: an immitation.
Then there are the constant repetitions: "Joanna praised" is one that comes to mind. The author also finds it necessary to remind the reader TWICE that Holmes used to say: "if you rule out the impossible, whatever is left - however improbable - must be the truth" (hope I quoted correctly) and that "the fox should not be aware of the hound hunting him"
On the other hand in all his effort the author (and the proofreader) neglected to notice that "first floor" in Britain is the first upper floor, i.e. "second floor" in the US. So the suspect probably would have broken some bones jumping from the first floor window of a building from the 1600s.
Additionally there are several historical hickups. How should a 1914 street urchin sent in the woods tell when it's 10 pm? Surely he wouldn't own a watch. British naval intelligence finding out stuff about the family of a German who came to England decades ago, as if they had the internet. A butler trying to commit suicide in the masters motorcar by carbonmonoxide poisoning? (which a butler wouldn't do, and which most likely wouldn't have worked anyway the way cars where built at that time.)


In the first book the whole concept of Sherlock Holmes having a daughter who reconnects to Dr. Watson - still living at 221B Baker Street - intrigued me. However I also already had some misgivings that for each and every major character of Conan Doyles stories there was an exact counterpart. There's a Dr. John Watson Jr., there's an inspector Lestrade Jr. *sigh* and - here it gets really unbelievable - there's even a Mrs Hudson Jr.
In the first book the author even goes as far as to having Holmes' daughter Joanna Blalock fetch the offspring of a famous tracker dog Sherlock Holmes once used. Of course all of this creates an atmosphere of familiarity but is also far from creative and simply is not believable any more.
Joanna Blalock at first came across very similar to Sherlock Holmes, is however much more open and less secretive. In the first book she also tries to be gentle with peoples feelings. In the second book however it comes across more and more like a master talking to his prized lap dog. Every time the younger or elder Watson says something correct she counters with something like "Bravo. You're really coming along nicely as a detective" ... attaboy, have a treat ...
However the fact of the matter is: with Goldberg the clues found are far more obvious and sometimes very easy to decipher. With Conan Doyle, Holmes was ALWAYS a step ahead of Watson AND the reader because he noticed something the others had not noticed. This happens with Goldberg's characters too from time to time, however often clues are there for all to see, and to be blunt: some things are so obvious that even someone like me can see them before Sherlock 2.0 even mentions them to her collegues.
In addition night-long smoking and thinking does not seem to work as well for Mrs Blalock as it did for Holmes. The story of book two seems static. The great detective and her sidekicks run about the estate for two days without a plan or any significant progress or clues. After the first big discovery in the room where the object was stolen, nothing really happens for 3 hours listening time. Except for the fact that more and more clues pop up that will send the wrong man to jail. The solution for that is ... well ... outrageously far fetched.
All in all after listening to the first two books I find them to be insulting to Conan Doyle's legacy. The author is incredibly lazy with his characters - basically copying them 25 years later - and the stories are unimaginative, long winded, barely believable and tiresome. I will return both of them.
BTW: you may have noticed that I was lazy too, since I allowed myself to write and post this review for both books.