A Meeting with Medusa

Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
Length: 1 hr and 59 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (145 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"A Meeting with Medusa" was first published in the December 1971 issue of Playboy.

Sir Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) is regarded as one of the most-influential science fiction writers of all time. He was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame.

©2000 Arthur C. Clarke (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about A Meeting with Medusa

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Entertaining

Nice story, but a bit predictable...except for the very end. Narration was excellent; easy to understand even while driving.

3 people found this helpful

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Prelude for the Reynolds / Baxter collaboration

A Meeting with Medusa is an Arthur C Clarke novella that was originally published by Playboy in 1971. The story is in the straightforward style of sci-fi from the mid-20th century where a sci-fi concept was the dominant theme and focus of the story. In this case, Howard Falcon who begins the tale as an airship (helium rather than hydrogen) is seriously injured in an accident. At some future point, he pursues a project to pilot a "space" airship into the upper Jovian atmosphere and discovers strange lifeforms existing in a gaseous ocean-life environment, one of which he calls a "Medusa."

The sci-fi elements beyond the interplanetary space travel involve strange alien life forms adapted to conditions unique to Jupiter, including a sense for radiowaves. At the same time, Falcon is revealed as a one of a kind "cyborg" as a result of his earlier accident. With the Jovian creatures and Howard himself, Clarke seems to have initiated an exploration of beyond human intelligence, but the story ends as if he simply grew bored.

The narration is adequate without the need for much variety or range. As a lengthy prologue for the subsequent (>30 years later) Reynolds / Baxter collaboration, this novella introduces the main character and hints at future possibilities.

7 people found this helpful

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Interesting!

Arti certainly had a way with words and a very creative way to veiw things.

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Great imagination

As always, Arthur C Clarke takes you into his world of Sci-fi
GREAT BOOK and well read.

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Bad Narrator

Story is interesting. The narration brings it down. It’s an odd style that seems very old and tired.

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Two Different Stories

The ending of this story, while an interesting and lightly hinted at twist, bears no thematic relationship with the rest of the story, as far as I could discern. It's like the ending of a different story altogether. If I really stretch, I can see the future Clarke was alluding to from the protagonist's view, but this is far from sufficiently elucidated. After listening I assumed that this was an early work, but not so. In fact, it won awards. All hail Clarke.

The writing is enjoyable, the phenomena interesting and even fascinating, the forecast thought provoking. However, as a whole, it just doesn't gel.

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Interesting story, inadequate reading performance

One of those performances with overly zealous articulation at completely ordinary times, but flatlining at peak moments. Not too terrible, just distracting. The story is interesting enough.

1 person found this helpful