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Thinking, Fast and Slow Audiobook
Thinking, Fast and Slow
Written by: 
Daniel Kahneman
Narrated by: 
Patrick Egan
Thinking, Fast and Slow Audiobook

Thinking, Fast and Slow

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Publisher's Summary

The guru to the gurus at last shares his knowledge with the rest of us. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman's seminal studies in behavioral psychology, behavioral economics, and happiness studies have influenced numerous other authors, including Steven Pinker and Malcolm Gladwell. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman at last offers his own, first book for the general public. It is a lucid and enlightening summary of his life's work. It will change the way you think about thinking.

Two systems drive the way we think and make choices, Kahneman explains: System One is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System Two is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Examining how both systems function within the mind, Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities as well as the biases of fast thinking and the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and our choices. Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, he shows where we can trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking, contrasting the two-system view of the mind with the standard model of the rational economic agent.

Kahneman's singularly influential work has transformed cognitive psychology and launched the new fields of behavioral economics and happiness studies. In this path-breaking book, Kahneman shows how the mind works, and offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and personal lives - and how we can guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2011 Daniel Kahneman (P)2011 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

“A tour de force. . . Kahneman’s book is a must read for anyone interested in either human behavior or investing. He clearly shows that while we like to think of ourselves as rational in our decision making, the truth is we are subject to many biases. At least being aware of them will give you a better chance of avoiding them, or at least making fewer of them.” (Larry Swedroe, CBS News)

“A major intellectual event . . . The work of Kahneman and Tversky was a crucial pivot point in the way we see ourselves.” (David Brooks, The New York Times)

“[Thinking, Fast and Slow] is wonderful, of course. To anyone with the slightest interest in the workings of his own mind, it is so rich and fascinating that any summary would seem absurd.” (Michael Lewis, Vanity Fair)

What Members Say

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Performance
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  •  
    Annoy Ken USA 02-16-15
    Annoy Ken USA 02-16-15 Listener Since 2010

    annoy_ken

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    33
    4
    Overall
    "Egan is spectacular"

    An entertaining book skillfully read by Egan.

    One of the few books that is much easier and faster to listen to rather than read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    truth seeker 02-12-15 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
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    3
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    "Helped me learn"
    Would you listen to Thinking, Fast and Slow again? Why?

    This book is written by the expert who studied this their whole life. I learned so much. It is thick at times but it will help you grow as an individual and learn how to think. I can't recommend it enough.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Audiack - Casual PC Builder 02-04-15 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
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    12
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    "Strong Expertise, Appropriately Dry"

    Great book on the function (not the anatomy) of the brain. and inspired narrative regarding the human psychology and behavior that result from and interaction between the author's two-part model of brain function.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric M. Schloegel Jr. New Orleans 01-27-15
    Eric M. Schloegel Jr. New Orleans 01-27-15 Member Since 2014

    BIG E

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    9
    2
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    "Why our brains react the way they do"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes - Great way to understand how our brains make split second decisions and how outside forces can influence your decision.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brian 01-27-15
    Brian 01-27-15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    4
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    "Arrogance, BIas, Self Certainty"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    I'd definitely have the author simply give the information from the studies he did rather than telling the audience what to think about the outcome. He spends some of the time attacking other professionals and making statements that seem to subtly be intended to convey how much cleverer he is than they are. For example, he talks about the foundation brought about by Bill Gates investing in small schools but that how according to the results of empirical studies that the results of student learning within small schools are simply more volatile in their results rather than actually being consistently better or worse than the performance within larger schools. Despite the questionable accuracy via usually never having a full sample of everyone in question when it comes to relevant respondents for a certain statistic and the false sense of security implicated in having a fixed number regarding statistics overall, The author seems very sure of himself when it comes to the outcomes of the studies he suggests and that bias to me feels more like a sort of intellectual chest pounding than any profound insight that I should be noting. There is a chapter in the book that addresses anchoring, which is a way of saying that we will have certain preconceptions in a certain situation when we have been given a sort of reference point that can often influence human decisions. In this chapter he introduces the concept of suggestion, meaning that a person can influence a certain reaction into being merely by suggesting its existence. It seems situationally ironic to me that it seems to be what he's doing throughout the entire book by naming his studies and then telling us what to think about the outcome after being given the subject matter and the data that he suggests. Should not he should be using his intellect to help us find other interpretations and possibilities so we can choose among them the most likely outcome that we can find for ourselves? Does the truth not exist in a realm of possibilities? Why are we only being given limited information in the form of his conclusions, delivered in a self certain way at that? In short, I can register the implications that he's making but I'm constantly having to make note of points at which I disagree with how self-certain he is. As far as I've experienced, although the truth can be expressed in a range of ways, the easiest way to initially understand the truth is to simply realize that it exists independently of our understanding of it and to be open to the other potential options until consistency in one facet or another seems to reasonably point at a specific outcome. I think anything analyzed severely enough can be made to seem preposterous but in a realistic way, when open to any option or interpretation that presents itself, consistency in certain outcomes given common circumstances and one controlled variable, usually the truth will come forth that way as long as we are aware about the dynamics of the situation in question. This can be without us listening to some extremely self-certain individual who appears to be harboring loads of biases. Also, I'd use simpler vocabulary and I'd use less morbid subject matter in some of the statistical examples he uses because is this book more about showing how smart he is or enlightening the public?


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Patrick Egan?

    I was fine with the narrator though I don't mind hearing Matt Damon


    Did Thinking, Fast and Slow inspire you to do anything?

    To not be impressed by Nobel Prize winners because human flaws seem ubiquitous across the entire spectrum of our species


    Any additional comments?

    His intense willingness to judge people based on general group affiliation betrays something notably conservative: in group favoritism and outgroup derogation. Things like this are not unbiased and to me, and the truth and bias seem to be polar opposites. The truth to me represents a range of things that are true in and of themselves and true, also making other things true, to further degrees depending in a situational way based on other factors. There is no absolute truth independent of our own biased means of observance that we will ever be likely to access, usually, other than our ability to simply sit back and watch it exist. To me the difference between truth and perception is that truth exists in and of itself and perception is what we talk about. Perception seems able to mirror truth but at any given moment can diverge without our awareness of its divergence whatsoever. Knowing this, I am not inclined to let the fact that a group of experts as awarded a Nobel Prize to a man influence me not to use my truest sense of reality to question him and the material based on the flaws they betray.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Timothy College Station, TX, United States 01-24-15
    Timothy College Station, TX, United States 01-24-15 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Every human should read this."

    This book is so good, so packed with useful, practical, mind-expanding information, that every human being should read this. This book will make you a better person. No matter what your interests, career, etc., this book has insights that will make you better.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeff Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 01-19-15
    Jeff Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 01-19-15 Member Since 2016
    ratings
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    12
    2
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    "Everyone should read this book. Everyone."

    Well written with interesting studies and stories, this book should be on everyone's to-read list. The world would be a much better place if we were all more aware of our thinking biases, and this book does an excellent job of pointing them out.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeff Berry South Jordan, UT United States 01-06-15
    Jeff Berry South Jordan, UT United States 01-06-15 Member Since 2014

    zberryfunk

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    Overall
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    Story
    "Good intro to cognitive biases"

    This book has a ton of great information on cognitive biases written in an accessible and clear style. Kahneman isn't a Nobel prize winner and this work summarizes a lot of his clever research on behavior. The only downside to this book is that it has so much information, it starts to feel like reading a list about half way through. Also the text refers to a pdf file with figures that make listening in the car difficult to follow in some sections.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    twirling dancer Seattle, Washington 01-05-15
    twirling dancer Seattle, Washington 01-05-15 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
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    4
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    "Slow listen for fast thinkers"
    Any additional comments?

    The information within this book is useful and easy to absorb. I listened to this book on a long car drive and found it to be slow and difficult to stay interested in. It may be an easier book to actually sit down and read. The author often repeats the same phrases and I finally had to stop listening because I was tired of hearing the reader continuously say "system 1 thinking" or "system 2 thinking". I may come back to this book and listen to it at a faster speed, or skip over some of it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vegard Kjoelhamar 01-04-15
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    12
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    "Very entertaining"

    Makes one think about irrational choices one has made and how one can reduce irrational choices in the future. But as Kahneman suggests, it won't become easy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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