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One Fearful Yellow Eye: A Travis McGee Novel, Book 8 | [John D. MacDonald]

One Fearful Yellow Eye: A Travis McGee Novel, Book 8

How to you extort $600,000 from a dying man? Someone had done it very quietly and skilfully to the husband of Travis McGee's ex-girlfriend. McGee flies to Chicago to help untangle the mess and discovers that, although Dr. Fortner Geis had led an exemplary life, there were those who'd take advantage of one "indiscretion" and bring down the whole family. McGee also discovers he likes a few members of the family far too much to let that happen....
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Publisher's Summary

How to you extort $600,000 from a dying man? Someone had done it very quietly and skilfully to the husband of Travis McGee's ex-girlfriend. McGee flies to Chicago to help untangle the mess and discovers that, although Dr. Fortner Geis had led an exemplary life, there were those who'd take advantage of one "indiscretion" and bring down the whole family. McGee also discovers he likes a few members of the family far too much to let that happen....

©1966 John D. MacDonald Publishing, Inc. Renewal © 1994 Maynard MacDonald (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

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  •  
    Raymond Madison, WI, United States 09-18-12
    Raymond Madison, WI, United States 09-18-12 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    51
    ratings
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    17
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    "Just the Best!"
    Where does One Fearful Yellow Eye rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    MacDonald's stories are complex yet rather easy to follow and very entertaining. The author has that rare talent for lulling the reader into thinking the story is over but then springs a real shocker at the end.


    What did you like best about this story?

    Aside from a terrific and entertaining plot, MacDonald inserts his own philosophy about people that brings life and vitality to the story. And even though the books were written in the 1960s, his world views seem very contemporary.


    What about Robert Petkoff’s performance did you like?

    Robert Petkoff could read the dictionary and make it sound exciting. When he changes voices to reflect the many and varied characters you think that there must be more than just Petkoff speaking. And, unlike some narrators, Robert doesn't sound like he's reading. Travis McGee becomes real, the characters become real, and the story becomes real. And all the while someone is telling this crasy story.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kelli REDDING, CA, United States 10-07-13
    Kelli REDDING, CA, United States 10-07-13

    spa wench

    HELPFUL VOTES
    20
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    57
    41
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    9
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    Story
    "anachronisms make this tough-going"

    I'll be honest, I haven't finished this yet. I can only listen for about 30 minutes at a time once or twice a week. I don't know if the story was actually written in the dark ages or if it is a plot device, but this is absolutely written in man's-man tone. It oozes flinty stares and cigar smoke and tough guys and gum-shoe detecting and dames. There is quite a bit of ethnic profiling and subtext. The characters are fairly stereotypical and the women are mostly delivered in the same tone. They are either "gosh golly, Trav..." kinda gals, cynical ice-maiden harridens or trusty side-kick dames.
    I am not saying there is anything wrong with this type of writing, I am just finding it hard going and a distraction from the storyline. i might try something more current by this author.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janels 08-04-13
    Janels 08-04-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Maybe good in its time...."

    I didn't realize that this book was almost 40 years old when I got it, and I'm glad I didn't spend a full credit for it. In spite of coming from John D. MacDonald's area of Florida, sharing an alma mater, and agreeing that he is well-written; when read now, this book verges on being offensive. The attitudes and vocabulary seem to be rooted well before 1966, and the misogynistic and politically incorrect descriptions would seem worthy of the 50s or earlier. Women are "broads", he refers to "limeys", "spics" and "Japs", the dialogue is filled with phrasing such as "lordy me, oh my", "holy maloney", "honest to Betsy", "golly", "doll", "negro", calls dislikable men "silly as girls", speaks about a woman as "40" across her secretarial butt", and makes arguments for how it is understandable for a chronic philanderer with the ladies to bed someone whenever he is stressed or sad. He calls women "fine merchandise" and compares them to sports cars that are "responsive when mastered". He credits himself with entitlement to bed a woman, likening her to "cherries jubilee" because he passed up the "cream pie" of the farm wife. He tells one woman to "go back to your cotton patch, cornpone".

    It would be more understandable if he was really channelling Sam Spade; but the misogyny of Spade's era was legendary, and considerably before the 60s. Consequently, Travis appeared an egotistic, self-agrandizing buffoon who considered himself to be God's gift to women everywhere. The plot was predictable, and he was lame. The novel came off as as he would describe as "dime store". Forgivable if placed in the 40s, but unevolved and thereby distractingly trite even for the 60s.

    I know there is a huge contingent of Travis McGee fans, which is why I finally read this. For the life of me, I can't figure out why. It is like watching a movie when "talkies" were first made, with similar dialogue and depth of character.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    06-04-12
    06-04-12 Listener Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "?"
    If you could sum up One Fearful Yellow Eye in three words, what would they be?

    good read


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    travis: he makes the stories work


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    as long as the narrator has an average voice and good diction no problem. otherwise he/she has no effect for me


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    all was good


    Any additional comments?

    no

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael 05-14-12
    Michael 05-14-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not what I remembered"
    Any additional comments?

    I read many of the Travis McGee books in the late '60s and early '70s and urged others to try them. Listening to this "Yellow Eye" book, I kept thinking who was I at the time that I really liked this macho, moralizing character (it's actually the moralizing that gets to me)? Are the other books different, and maybe I never read this one? I don't know. The plot line is good, well, sometimes stretched too much even for the genre, and I guess Petkoff does a good job. But I think I'll stop Mr. MacDonald with this one. I would like to again see MacDonald's "A Flash of Green," a non-McGee story filmed for TV in 1984 with Ed Harris.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful

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