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Social Sciences

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PHIL

PHIL San Diego, CA, United States Member Since 2011
HELPFUL VOTES
290
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134
129
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2
  • "Basic, but very well explained"

    Overall
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    This is a very good entry point (or refresher) for statistics. The author obviously invested time in putting together clear and simple examples. More advanced stats people might be disappointed. I like this better than another broad-audience statistics book, "The Signal and the Noise" by Nate Silver. For me, the explanations here are clearer and the concepts flow better.

    More

    Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Charles Wheelan
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (281)
    Performance
    (246)
    Story
    (248)

    From batting averages and political polls to game shows and medical research, the real-world application of statistics continues to grow by leaps and bounds. How can we catch schools that cheat on standardized tests? How does Netflix know which movies you'll like? What is causing the rising incidence of autism? As best-selling author Charles Wheelan shows us in Naked Statistics, the right data and a few well-chosen statistical tools can help us answer these questions and more.

    Ardenne says: "Excellent Round the World Encapsulation of Stats"
  • "A gem"

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    Some people may be put off by the academic language and many references to history (which a widely-read person will recognize), especially early in the book. For me, my patience was pretty quickly rewarded. Listening to the sample will give a good sense of this. This author is digging through (and mapping out) something absolutely vital: what we see as good, right, wrong, by ourselves and in groups, and then, how we really act in situations that challenge us in these ways. The author takes us through history and all kinds of ways of thought from ancient times through the present (spanning philosophy, various branches of science, folkways and religions, tracing right up into the recent cognitive psychology) showing the sort of grab-bag we use, in arriving at who to be, what to do, and how to react. I find the language to be crackling English prose with an ideally English narrator, but I admit I do have a high verbal IQ and lots of education. If you like to take apart what you and others feel and do, and you like a bigger context in history and various ways of thought, it's ideal.

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    Experiments in Ethics

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Kwame Anthony Appiah
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (11)

    In the past few decades, scientists of human nature--including experimental and cognitive psychologists, neuroscientists, evolutionary theorists, and behavioral economists--have explored the way we arrive at moral judgments. They have called into question commonplaces about character and offered troubling explanations for various moral intuitions. Research like this may help explain what, in fact, we do and feel. But can it tell us what we ought to do or feel?

    PHIL says: "A gem"
  • "Brilliant -- so many "aha" ..."

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    I have been looking for this book for more than a year: a clear entry point, and survey, of a cluster of ideas within economics, dealing with motives and dynamics within any organization, family group or society, toward cooperation or cheating. This is, to me, the most central concern of society, the greatest burden of any family, company, society, legal system, or deal. It is the central unspoken topic of politics: who are the free riders gaming and thus threatening the system? The rich? The poor? Various terms relate to this: agency problems (the people you hire or trust have motives to cheat), information asymmetry (different players know different things and exploit this); game theory (with various situations illustrating choices to cooperate or defect, such as "the prisoner's dilemma" and "the tragedy of the commons"). This book provides a lucid, carefully assembled, entry point and survey of these kinds of topics. I love a book that maps out and gives names to things I experience every day, that gives me a higher and clearer view and understanding of these things. In my search for this book, I have assembled many more technical books (which quickly leave the plain English discussion for lots of math), and now at last I feel I can have the comprehension to move into these more advanced levels. But this book is fine in itself, for the popular audience. There is much basis for wisdom and better choices here.

    More

    Meeting at Grand Central: Understanding the Social and Evolutionary Roots of Cooperation

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Lee Cronk, Beth L. Leech.
    • Narrated By Claire Christie
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    From the family to the workplace to the marketplace, every facet of our lives is shaped by cooperative interactions. Yet everywhere we look, we are confronted by proof of how difficult cooperation can be - snarled traffic, polarized politics, overexploited resources, social problems that go ignored. The benefits to oneself of a free ride on the efforts of others mean that collective goals often are not met. But compared to most other species, people actually cooperate a great deal. Why is this?

    PHIL says: "Brilliant -- so many "aha" moments"
  1. Naked Statistics: Strippi...
  2. Experiments in Ethics
  3. Meeting at Grand Central:...
  4. .

A Peek at Simone's Bookshelf

Helpful
Votes
302
 
243 REVIEWS / 378 ratings Member Since 2006 45 Followers / Following 5
 
Simone's greatest hits:
  • You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself

    "Hopefully I am a LITTLE smarter now!"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an audiobook I wish I owned in book form.

    There are so many interesting snippets of information that I would like to go back and read again, so a table of contents would be immensely helpful!! It’s a very fun and intriguing book, full of “common sense” yet it makes you stop and reflect on your own behaviours and why you act the way you act and do the things you do. Lots of “nod your head in agreement” moments.

    The set up is very simple to follow and it’s an easy and fast read – naturally, given that it’s a book about the psychology of human behaviour so they KNOW what format is going to work!

    Learning about Priming, Confirmation Bias and Ad Hominem Fallacy to name a few, I saw a lot of myself in here and you will too! I laughed out loud at the chapter that explains why my books-to-read list (and the kind of books on it) is so long! But to my previous point: I don’t have a table of contents available so I can’t tell you what it’s called!!

  • Why You Think the Way You Do: The Story of Western Worldviews from Rome to Home

    "REALLI misleading title!"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “Why You Think The Way You Do” is a really misleading title!!! I still have no clue after finishing the book. The subtitle is a little closer to the mark: “The Story of Western Worldviews from Rome to Home” but even that is not completely accurate in my opinion. I think “The Evolution of Philosophy and Western Civilization” would have been more appropriate, although some people would say that’s splitting hairs.

    The subject matter was all very interesting, I like reading about Europe in the Middle Ages, the discovery the New World, the Renaissance, the Reformation, Revolutions, etc. and I liked the way the book presented the information – as a continuous narrative - but it gave me ZERO insight into why I think the way I think. I didn’t learn anything; I was just entertained with interesting information.

    The author was not objective however, and I did not appreciate the lecture at the end – I almost felt chastised!

  • Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad

    "Behind the Scenes"

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    Story

    Unlike “The Butler” where I did not realize it was a “behind the scenes” book and therefore didn’t like it because I felt duped, I knew what this book was all about in advance so I only have myself to blame if I didn’t like it. I suspected that his might be the case just based on the title; however I decide to give it a shot anyway.

    My attention was up and down throughout. As predicted, I was very captivated when the subject covered a show I’d seen (Sopranos and Mad Men), I loved the tidbits and factoids, and whole TVography was interesting…. great fun! But when it came to shows I hadn’t seen, I tuned out – I really was not interested.

    Not surprisingly therefore I’d recommend it to people who have watched all the shows featured – it’s way more fun that way!

  • Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking

    "Very Interesting, Very Detailed, Very Long."

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I first became aware of the concept of Social Engineering when I read “Ghost in the Wires” and I was blown away! It was very exciting – that guy has GUTS!

    I wanted to read more about the technique, not necessarily with the goal of learning how to social-engineer people in mind, but rather to try and recognize the signs so I can detect if ever I am being social-engineered!

    This book is quite thorough and there is no denying the material is interesting, but I found it too long. There was too much “telling me about what I’m about to read” which I found completely redundant and annoying. Don’t tell me about what you are going to write, just write it and let me read it!!

    Aside from that complaint, the book had me hooked.

Gary

Gary Las Cruces, NM, United States 07-20-12 Member Since 2001

Letting the rest of the world go by

HELPFUL VOTES
462
ratings
REVIEWS
166
143
FOLLOWERS
FOLLOWING
120
2
  • "Hard not to learn something by read..."

    6 of 7 helpful votes

    The author's survey on early civilizations is worth the cost of the book alone. Societies tend toward more complex organization as they spread their cultural memes. The arc of history tends towards working together by utilizing win-win situations. Constructive coordination defeats the second law of thermodynamics (entropy) for the coordinators. Yes, that's a mouthful, but the author is expert at clearly explaining it all.

    The two items needed for economic development, cheap transportation and effective communication, are facilitated by higher population density leading to more growth and technological developments hence an evolving of civilizations.

    The book was originally copyrighted over 10 years ago (today is 2012). The book only lost my interest when he was topical and futuristic during about 2 hours of the second half. I was ready to give up and I'm glad I didn't. The book then got really interesting by tying together his major theme on the organization of organic processes. He got into the second law of thermodynamics, and how information and the processing of that information at its core is physical.

    His real theme is that cultures evolve by constructive coordination (win-win situations) but he supports that by educating the listener through historical narratives, fine points on economic theory and the importance of information processing for growth.

    I enjoyed this book so much I've downloaded his next book, "The Evolution of God".

    More

    Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Robert Wright
    • Narrated By Kevin T. Collins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (129)
    Performance
    (79)
    Story
    (80)

    At the beginning of Nonzero, Robert Wright sets out to "define the arrow of the history of life, from the primordial soup to the World Wide Web." Twenty-two chapters later, after a sweeping and vivid narrative of the human past, he has succeeded and has mounted a powerful challenge to the conventional view that evolution and human history are aimless.

    Douglas says: "A Nice Follow-Up..."

What's Trending in Social Sciences:

  • 4.8 (15 ratings)

    The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs)
    • By Matt Taibbi
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    Poverty goes up. Crime goes down. The prison population doubles. Fraud by the rich wipes out 40 percent of the world’s wealth. The rich get massively richer. No one goes to jail. In search of a solution, journalist Matt Taibbi discovered the Divide, the seam in American life where our two most troubling trends - growing wealth inequality and mass incarceration - come together, driven by a dramatic shift in American citizenship: Our basic rights are now determined by our wealth or poverty.

    Michael says: "Capitalism and Democracy Collide"
  • 4.5 (8929 ratings)

    Outliers: The Story of Success

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Narrated By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8929)
    Performance
    (3536)
    Story
    (3542)

    In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing.

    S Prabhu says: "Excellent book; well adapted for the audio format"
  • 4.5 (4354 ratings)

    Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Christopher McDougall
    • Narrated By Fred Sanders
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4354)
    Performance
    (2144)
    Story
    (2177)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: Want to join the “superhumans”? Luckily you don’t have to run to catch up with them, thanks to McDougall’s and Sanders’ inspiring (and motivating) journey through history, science, physiology, health, entertaining characters and unlikely friendships. Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure.

    Corey says: "Amazing read - even for non-runners"
  • 4.3 (4126 ratings)

    The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Narrated By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4126)
    Performance
    (1820)
    Story
    (1822)

    In The Tipping Point, New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in society happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant. These are social epidemics, and the moment when they take off, when they reach their critical mass, is the Tipping Point.

    David says: "Makes sense to me."
  •  
  • 4.3 (3332 ratings)

    Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Susan Cain
    • Narrated By Kathe Mazur
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3332)
    Performance
    (2862)
    Story
    (2832)

    At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

    Teddy says: "Thought provoking and Uplifting.... A++++++++!!!!!"
  • 4.4 (3228 ratings)

    The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Michael Pollan
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3228)
    Performance
    (1004)
    Story
    (1002)

    "What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

    Stephen Redding says: "Great presentation of a moral dilemma"
  • 4.4 (2455 ratings)

    God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Christopher Hitchens
    • Narrated By Christopher Hitchens
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2455)
    Performance
    (1207)
    Story
    (1199)

    In the tradition of Bertrand Russell's Why I Am Not a Christian and Sam Harris' recent best-seller, The End of Faith, Christopher Hitchens makes the ultimate case against religion. With a close and erudite reading of the major religious texts, he documents the ways in which religion is a man-made wish, a cause of dangerous sexual repression, and a distortion of our origins in the cosmos.

    ben capozzi says: "...Though Hitchens Is!"
  • 4.3 (1571 ratings)

    Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Gary Taubes
    • Narrated By Mike Chamberlain
    Overall
    (1571)
    Performance
    (932)
    Story
    (926)

    Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what’s making us fat—and how we can change—in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes’s crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.

    Igor says: "Are you looking for an attachement for the book?"
  • The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs)
    • By Matt Taibbi
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    Poverty goes up. Crime goes down. The prison population doubles. Fraud by the rich wipes out 40 percent of the world’s wealth. The rich get massively richer. No one goes to jail. In search of a solution, journalist Matt Taibbi discovered the Divide, the seam in American life where our two most troubling trends - growing wealth inequality and mass incarceration - come together, driven by a dramatic shift in American citizenship: Our basic rights are now determined by our wealth or poverty.

    Michael says: "Capitalism and Democracy Collide"
  • This Explains Everything: Deep, Beautiful, and Elegant Theories of How the World Works

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By John Brockman
    • Narrated By Ann Marie Lee, Michelle Ford, Peter Berkrot, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    In This Explains Everything, John Brockman, founder and publisher of Edge.org, asked experts in numerous fields and disciplines to come up with their favorite explanations for everyday occurrences. Why do we recognize patterns? Is there such a thing as positive stress? Are we genetically programmed to be in conflict with each other? Those are just some of the 150 questions that the world's best scientific minds answer with elegant simplicity.

    Gary says: "An ode to science by making you feel the science"
  • Outliers: The Story of Success

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Narrated By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8929)
    Performance
    (3536)
    Story
    (3542)

    In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing.

    S Prabhu says: "Excellent book; well adapted for the audio format"
  • The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Narrated By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4126)
    Performance
    (1820)
    Story
    (1822)

    In The Tipping Point, New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in society happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant. These are social epidemics, and the moment when they take off, when they reach their critical mass, is the Tipping Point.

    David says: "Makes sense to me."
  •  
  • The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance - What Women Should Know

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Katty Kay, Claire Shipman
    • Narrated By Sandy Rustin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Working women today are better educated and more well-qualified than ever before. Yet men still predominate in the corporate world. In The Confidence Code, Claire Shipman and Katty Kay argue that the key reason is confidence.

    Combining cutting-edge research in genetics, gender, behavior, and cognition - with examples from their own lives and those of other successful women in politics, media, and business - Kay and Shipman go beyond admonishing women to "lean in".

  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Susan Cain
    • Narrated By Kathe Mazur
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3332)
    Performance
    (2862)
    Story
    (2832)

    At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

    Teddy says: "Thought provoking and Uplifting.... A++++++++!!!!!"
  • Mastery

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Robert Greene
    • Narrated By Fred Sanders
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (661)
    Performance
    (585)
    Story
    (581)

    What did Charles Darwin, middling schoolboy and underachieving second son, do to become one of the earliest and greatest naturalists the world has known? What were the similar choices made by Mozart and by Caesar Rodriguez, the U.S. Air Force's last ace fighter pilot? In Mastery, Robert Greene's fifth book, he mines the biographies of great historical figures for clues about gaining control over our own lives and destinies. Picking up where The 48 Laws of Power left off, Greene culls years of research and original interviews to blend historical anecdote and psychological insight, distilling the universal ingredients of the world's masters.

    John says: "Better if Half the Length"
  • Think Like a Freak: The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
    • Narrated By Stephen J. Dubner
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    The New York Times best-selling Freakonomics changed the way we see the world, exposing the hidden side of just about everything. Now, with Think Like a Freak, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner have written their most revolutionary book yet. With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, they take us inside their thought process and offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems. The topics range from business to philanthropy to sports to politics, all with the goal of retraining your brain.

  •  
  • Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Mary Roach
    • Narrated By Emily Woo Zeller
    Overall
    (806)
    Performance
    (708)
    Story
    (713)

    Best-selling author Mary Roach returns with a new adventure to the invisible realm we carry around inside. Roach takes us down the hatch on an unforgettable tour. The alimentary canal is classic Mary Roach terrain: The questions explored in Gulp are as taboo, in their way, as the cadavers in Stiff and every bit as surreal as the universe of zero gravity explored in Packing for Mars. Why is crunchy food so appealing? Why is it so hard to find words for flavors and smells? Why doesn’t the stomach digest itself? How much can you eat before your stomach bursts?

    Kirstin says: "Mary Roach Does Not Disappoint!"
  • Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Politics

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Charles Krauthammer
    • Narrated By Charles Krauthammer, George Newbern
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (250)
    Performance
    (220)
    Story
    (224)

    A brilliant stylist known for an uncompromising honesty that challenges conventional wisdom at every turn, Krauthammer has for decades dazzled readers with his keen insight into politics and government. His weekly column is a must-read in Washington and across the country. Now, finally, the best of Krauthammer's intelligence, erudition, and wit are collected in one volume.

    Alan says: "Charles K, author and narrator ..... enuf said"
  • Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Narrated By Malcolm Gladwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (7031)
    Performance
    (1834)
    Story
    (1823)

    In his landmark best seller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant, in the blink of an eye, that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept?

    Liz says: "encore!"
  • Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Christopher McDougall
    • Narrated By Fred Sanders
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4354)
    Performance
    (2144)
    Story
    (2177)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: Want to join the “superhumans”? Luckily you don’t have to run to catch up with them, thanks to McDougall’s and Sanders’ inspiring (and motivating) journey through history, science, physiology, health, entertaining characters and unlikely friendships. Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure.

    Corey says: "Amazing read - even for non-runners"
  • Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Susan Burch, Hannah Joyner
    • Narrated By Corey Johnson
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Junius Wilson (1908-2001) spent 76 years at a state mental hospital in Goldsboro, North Carolina, including 6 in the criminal ward. He had never been declared insane by a medical professional or found guilty of any criminal charge. But he was deaf and black in the Jim Crow South. Unspeakable is the story of his life.

  • Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Brigid Schulte
    • Narrated By Tavia Gilbert
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    According to the Leisure Studies Department at the University of Iowa, true leisure is “that place in which we realize our humanity.” If that’s true, argues Brigid Schulte, then we're doing dangerously little realizing of our humanity. In Overwhelmed, Schulte, a staff writer for The Washington Post, asks: Are our brains, our partners, our culture, and our bosses making it impossible for us to experience anything but “contaminated time”?

  • The Illuminati's Greatest Hits: Deception, Conspiracies, Murders, and Assassinations by the World's Most Powerful Secret Society

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Frank White
    • Narrated By Mysti Jording
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Born through Adam Weishaupt, in 1776, the secret society group known as the Illuminati have been wreaking havoc on the world ever since. They have fomented wars and have manipulated events from behind the shadows to diabolically implement their agenda of a new world order. People have heard of the Illuminati through popular culture, but most brush off their existence as nothing more than some "conspiracy theory" hatched by conspiracy theorists without doing any valid research that would perhaps discount their existence.

  • Jerusalem

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Simon Sebag Montefiore
    • Narrated By John Lee
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    Jerusalem is the universal city, the capital of two peoples, the shrine of three faiths; it is the prize of empires, the site of Judgement Day, and the battlefield of today's clash of civilizations. From King David to Barack Obama, from the birth of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam to the Israel-Palestine conflict, this is the epic history of 3,000 years of faith, slaughter, fanaticism, and coexistence. How did this small, remote town become the Holy City, the 'centre of the world' and now the key to peace in the Middle East?

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  • Sex and the Founding Fathers: Sexuality Studies

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Thomas A. Foster
    • Narrated By Todd Curless
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    Biographers, journalists, and satirists have long used the subject of sex to define the masculine character and political authority of America's Founding Fathers. Tracing these commentaries on the Revolutionary Era's major political figures in Sex and the Founding Fathers, Thomas Foster shows how continual attempts to reveal the true character of these men instead exposes much more about Americans and American culture than about the Founders themselves.

  • Mirror, Mirror: The Uses and Abuses of Self-Love

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Simon Blackburn
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
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    Everyone deplores narcissism, especially in others. The vain are by turns annoying or absurd, offending us whether they are blissfully oblivious or proudly aware of their behavior. But are narcissism and vanity really as bad as they seem? Can we avoid them even if we try? In Mirror, Mirror, Simon Blackburn, the author of such best-selling philosophy books as Think, Being Good, and Lust, says that narcissism, vanity, pride, and self-esteem are more complex than they first appear and have innumerable good and bad forms.

  • Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Carla Kaplan
    • Narrated By Liisa Ivary
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
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    New York City in the Jazz Age was host to a pulsating artistic and social revolution. Uptown, an unprecedented explosion in black music, literature, dance, and art sparked the Harlem Renaissance. While the history of this African-American awakening has been widely explored, one chapter remains untold: The story of a group of women collectively dubbed “Miss Anne.” Kaplan’s formidable work remaps the landscape of the 1920s, and alters our perception of this historical moment.

  • The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance - What Women Should Know

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Katty Kay, Claire Shipman
    • Narrated By Sandy Rustin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
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    Working women today are better educated and more well-qualified than ever before. Yet men still predominate in the corporate world. In The Confidence Code, Claire Shipman and Katty Kay argue that the key reason is confidence.

    Combining cutting-edge research in genetics, gender, behavior, and cognition - with examples from their own lives and those of other successful women in politics, media, and business - Kay and Shipman go beyond admonishing women to "lean in".