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Publisher's Summary

What does the Bible say about the value of women? Does the Bible teach that women are as valuable as men, or does it portray them as somehow more flawed, more suspect, or weak and easily deceived?

Beginning from Genesis and working all the way through the story line of the Bible, Worthy demonstrates the significant and yes, even surprising, ways that God has used women to accomplish his kingdom goals. Like men, they are created in his image, and their lives reflect and declare his worth. Worthy will enable and encourage both men and women to embrace this true and lofty vision of God’s creation, plan, and their value in his eyes.

Best-selling author Elyse Fitzpatrick and pastor Eric Schumacher together invite women to embrace a transformative and empowering view of their Maker, themselves, and the church. But this isn’t only a book for women. It is also a book for men, especially leaders, who want to grow in their understanding of God’s perspective on women, people who normally make up the majority of their congregations. Men might be wondering if they’ve missed something amid the abuse scandals that are rocking the church. Might the headlines they’re reading today about abuse have their roots in a denigration of the value and worth of women?

Worthy: Celebrating the Value of Women will help every listener see the value, place, and calling of women through study questions and a “Digging Deeper” section that will help men and women discover how to cherish, value, and honor one another for God’s glory.

©2020 Elyse Fitzpatrick, Eric Schumacher (P)2020 Blackstone Publishing

What listeners say about Worthy

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Only 3 stars because this is soft complementarinism

Though this is a well written tribute to the value and significant role women played in the Biblical narrative it’s still complementarian. I still gave it 3 stars because I felt they presented a beautiful explanation to the importance of women. I took away 2 stars because they still hold to the belief that women can not hold the rank of pastor and that men are are still the head’s of their wives. The author even claimed that men are the “head of creation” (cue eye roll).

When Paul uses the word “head” in Ephesians 5:23, “For the husband is the head of the wife even as Christ is the head of the church.” The word “head” in the original Greek is not an authoritative word. It can be more directly translated as “source” or to “come from”, similar to the head of a river. Like Adam was the source of Eve. Or how Even came from Adam, ect.

The scriptures in 1 Timothy often used to prove that a woman can’t preach in church have been studied by historians and theologians. I recommend the book “The Making of Biblical Womanhood” by Beth Allison Barr. She does an excellent job as a historian explaining what Paul is saying here. To sum it up, Paul is nearly quoting a widely read book written to Subjugate women in Ancient Rome. The original text even has the statement in quotation marks to show that Paul is making a point that this IS NOT what we should be doing within the church. To be set a part from the world around them, it was unique that woman held office ect. Rome was very oppressive to women during this time. Barr does a much better job of breaking this down and can more accurately explain this concept then I can here. I highly recommend her book!!

Another issue I have with this book is that is seems to contradict itself. At the beginning they lay a foundation for the fact the Adam AND Eve were given the same mandate by God to rule and subdue the earth. My question is this: If men and women were given the same mandate, then why still hold to the belief that husbands are still the heads? The cross was meant to restore us back to a pre-fall state. This should also restore Eve back to her rightful place of EQUAL authority. It’s not equal authority beside Adam, if she is still unable to be a co-head and unable to hold a specific office(s) in the church.

I felt the authors, ALMOST, got it right. It was a beautiful extrapolation of the tremendous role women play. But I was left disappointed by the fact that they still can’t bring women to be equal with men in home and in position at church.

Another point I would like to bring up in support of Egalitarian beliefs, is the concept of the Trinity. We know from the Genesis account that God fashioned both Male and Female in His image. This must mean there is a feminine image of God. The Hebrew language supports this belief. Every time the Hebrew text spoke of the Spirit of God, it used a feminine pronoun. The Spirit of God is a SHE. Now let’s get back to the Trinity. Is the Holy Spirit any less authoritative than the Father or Jesus? NO! That’s heresy. So then, why would women, fashioned in the female image of God be any less authoritative then men? Is the Father or Jesus the head of the Holy Spirit? NO! Therefore I do not believe in a male-headship, no do I believe that women are to be excluded from any arena of leadership.

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One of the most important releases of 2020

A biblical theology book on women?! Get ready to have your eyes open. This book is glorious and hard-hitting.

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Every Christian man should read this book.

Especially those of you that thing you don't need it. I can honestly say, you've never studied what the Bible says about women like this before.

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Very helpful and eye-opening

This book has helped me see ways that I have wrongly jumped to conclusions about women without seeking to understand where they're coming from. It has helped me to really see how women have been de-valued by men or in our society, and really makes me want to learn more about womens perspectives, struggles and experience of life. I was especially encouraged by how they looked at God's value for women and men in the Bible as fellow humans made in God's image and partners in sharing the Gospel.

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We needed this!

What a time-appropriate, thoughtfully, and genuine book. They address hard things and encourage us toward Christ in our responses. I'm so grateful I took the time to listen. I will surely be purchasing this one, and handing it out like candy.

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Worthy is vital to more than just women.

Worthy is an incredible book that will leave the reader/listener different from when they started it. Regardless of where you land on the spectrum of egalitarianism and complementarianism, Christ is the author and finisher of our faith, and Worthy keeps Him at the center of this in-depth look at the role women have in Christ’s bride, the Church. From its spotlight on the seemingly standard and straightforward biblical accounts of women we all learn from an early age to the often skipped over deep theological passages that make us question women’s role in the church today, Worthy is a must-read.

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Hopeful

This book talks about the Bible in a way that is not often discussed

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Amazing

One of the most encouraging and empowering books I have read this year. So encouraged and thankful!!

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Powerful

To God all glory is due. This book helped me see my worth after 35 years of believing a lie.

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A valorous clarification of a woman’s worth according to her creator

I am moved by the courage that both authors had to have in order to face their short sighted views on women. I am left feeling loved, affirmed, validated, and most importantly hopeful that God is able to grow redeemed men and women into a family! A must read.

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  • 09-06-20

Hard hitting

A challenging read, a lot of things to think through. An in the trenches perspective. May add to a them and us feelings. Useful nonetheless.