• Whipping Star

  • By: Frank Herbert
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (246 ratings)

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Whipping Star  By  cover art

Whipping Star

By: Frank Herbert
Narrated by: Scott Brick
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Publisher's summary

In the far future, humankind has made contact with numerous other species - Gowachin, Laclac, Wreaves, Pan Spechi, Taprisiots, and Caleban (among others) - and has helped to form the ConSentiency to govern between the species. After suffering under a tyrannous pure democracy that had the power to create laws so fast that no thought could be given to the effects, the sentients of the galaxy found a need for the Bureau of Sabotage (BuSab) to slow the wheels of government, thereby preventing it from legislating recklessly.

In Whipping Star, Jorj X. McKie, a "Saboteur Extraordinary," is a born troublemaker who has naturally become one of BuSab's best agents. As the novel opens, it is revealed that Calebans, who are beings visible to other sentient species as stars, have been disappearing one by one. Each disappearance is accompanied by millions of sentient deaths and instances of incurable insanity.

Ninety years prior to the setting of Whipping Star, the Calebans appeared and offered jump-doors to the collective species, allowing sentients to travel instantly to any point in the universe. Gratefully accepting, the sentiency didn't question the consequences. Now Mliss Abnethe, a psychotic human female with immense power and wealth, has bound a Caleban in a contract that allows the Caleban to be whipped to death; when the Caleban dies, everyone who has ever used a jump-door (which is almost every adult in the sentient world and many of the young) will die as well.

©1970 Herbert Properties LLC (P)2008 Tantor

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