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Theories of Knowledge: How to Think About What You Know

Narrated by: Joseph H. Shieber
Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
4 out of 5 stars (14 ratings)

Regular price: $34.95

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Publisher's Summary

Humans have been attempting to understand for thousands of years what knowledge truly is and how we aquire it, but the more we learn about the human body, our brains, and the world around us, the more challenging the quest becomes. The 21st century is a fast-paced world of technological change and expanding social networks, a world where information is plentiful and cheap, but where truth is in short supply.

When it comes to our never-ending search for the truth about knowledge, there are innumerable questions and considerations. What is the best way to make a transformative decision, such as whether to have a child? What if common sense was diametrically opposed to rational decision theory? If you see the correct time on a stopped clock, do you really know what time it is? Is that genuine knowledge or simply chance? And does the distinction matter?

Our memories are one of our primary channels for knowledge, but much of what we “remember” is actually false memories or confabulations. Where does that leave us?

The above questions merely scratch the surface of “epistemology”, the philosophical term for our inquiry into knowledge: what it is, the ways we acquire it, and how we justify our beliefs as knowledge. Delve into this exciting field in Theories of Knowledge: How to Think About What You Know. Taught by acclaimed Professor Joseph H. Shieber of Lafayette College, these 24 mind-bending lectures take you from ancient philosophers to contemporary neurobiologists, and from wide-ranging social networks to the deepest recesses of your own brain.

Epistemology is as old as philosophy itself. Your survey takes you back to Plato, who defined knowledge in terms of “true belief” - a personal belief that corresponds with some external truth. You’ll see how this relationship between knowledge, belief, and the truth aligns with what 20th-century developmental psychologists have learned about children and the way we first begin to access information.

These types of connections - between philosophical history and our world today, and between abstract theory and observed, real-world examples - make this course a rare treat, transforming how you think about yourself, the world around you, and the very nature of reality.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2019 The Great Courses (P)2019 The Teaching Company, LLC

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  • 03-14-19

Great topic, but hard to keep up

A lot of the logical arguments had to string together several unfamiliar concepts, which decreased accessibility.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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i dont know nothing new

a lot of bla. all the time you think that next chapter there will have something. but no

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Should be named "Naval Gazing"

These diatribes really are misnamed. This series has nothing at all to do about "knowledge." Rather, it's more about ignorance -- blatant ignorance. This is just the kind of thing most people cannot stand about professors -- they don't live in the real world and some of them have completely lost touch. Mr. Shieber fits this description. I have 2 doctorates and enjoy heady material, but I don't like listening to made-up terms about made-up occurrences that are "tested" on little undergrads age 18-22.

9 of 39 people found this review helpful