Regular price: $27.99

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Best-selling author and PEN and Beyond Margins Award finalist Thrity Umrigar’s acclaimed novels “resonate with rich prose and vibrant depictions of India” (Booklist). In The World We Found, Armaiti, Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta - once friends at the University of Bombay - reconnect 30 years later when Armaiti is diagnosed with cancer. Coming together, all four women are forced to reexamine their lives.

©2012 Thrity Umrigar (P)2012 Recorded Books

Critic Reviews

“[A] powerful meditation on friendship, on loss, and all the regrets of middle age …” ( Boston Globe)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    22
  • 4 Stars
    24
  • 3 Stars
    11
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    20
  • 4 Stars
    15
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    17
  • 4 Stars
    18
  • 3 Stars
    12
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good story but performance not so much!

The story was exciting and well written. Soneela's narration not so much. Her lack of knowledge of the Hindi language is blatantly obvious. It would have been nice if they had someone who could actually pronounce the Hindi words!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

so worth reading

extraordinary book... from all angles...truly illuminating, heartbreaking... i couldnt stop reading it And will save it for rereads... wow!

gisele

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • KimM
  • GREENVILLE, SC, United States
  • 11-29-12

Thought Provoking

This is a lovely story of four college friends, now in their forties. It starts off beautifully by describing the changes in their lives and how they have stayed the same. One of them is terminally ill and initiates a reunion. This creates a conflict involving the friend who was forced to convert from Hindu to Muslim by her husband during the rising religious tensions in India. This book addresses issues of religious conflict, personal change and lost idealism. It is a decent read, especially if you are from India.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Lovely story, terrible reader

My experience of this book improved 100% after I abandoned the audiobook and picked up a hard copy. The reader's performance made the characters seem trite and the dialogue adolescent. Read the book - but bypass this performance!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Umriger Doesn't Disappoint

I really enjoy Thrity Umriger's books, and once again she has written a thought provoking novel, Four women friends, now nearing 50 years old, this is a story of their close friendships during college in Bombay in 1970's, the separate paths their lives have taken, their efforts to reunite and as they do so they learn about themselves and each other. In the process, the decisions they make may yet again change their lives. Thrity Umriger captures the complexities and complications of human relationships that cross culture, religion, geography. She treats her characters fairly, women and men, Hindu and Muslim. This story gave me a broader picture of life in India in the past 50 years. A good read and always thought-provoking.

Loved the audio version; narrator's use of accents gives it richness and a pleasant listening experience.

A very good book club book!


1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Almost. not quite

If you could sum up The World We Found in three words, what would they be?

It took me a while to get into the nook; I found the writing more " telling" me than showing me about the characters, but then I became engaged. I liked the characters, the plot was okay but a bit trite. The writing was spotty, very predictable and cliché ridden at times. The ending was too predictable and too tired. I was very hopeful in the middle of the book that I'd like it the rest of the way through but the ending let me down.

Did Soneela Nankani do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

The characters were the best part of the novel.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Karen
  • Napa, CA, United States
  • 08-15-12

Wonderful view into the lives of women of India.

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Definitely! A wonderful read...flowing, heartfelt.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The World We Found?

Perhaps the scene at the airport, at the end of the book....a culmination of characters acting their parts...so interesting.

Which character – as performed by Soneela Nankani – was your favorite?

...couldn't say, I liked them all.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

A view into the lives of women, across time.

Any additional comments?

Just a very good read.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Totally Engaging

Four college friends, revolutionaries, mature on different paths and are brought back together when one is faced with a fatal illness. Written from alternating points of view, the book poetically weaves their individual stories with images of a changing India. It is brilliant. And the performance is suberb, as the narrator slips seamlessly between voices and accents.