• The Tuttle Twins and the Leviathan Crisis

  • By: Connor Boyack
  • Narrated by: Nancy Peterson
  • Length: 30 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (21 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Why do politicians like it when we are afraid?

The Tuttle twins and their team of heroes tackle a new quest in an adventure game that they soon begin to realize is closer to reality than they might have guessed. A magical battle against the forces of Leviathan and its Idol turns out to be packed with lessons for what’s happening in the world around them.

Based on the book Crisis and Leviathan by Robert Higgs, this story finds the twins learning the power of truth in a world filled with fearmongering, ignorance, Trojan horses, and demagogues - a message with substantial relevance to our lives today.

©2021 Connor Boyack (P)2021 Connor Boyack

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More libertarian propaganda.

This series has an over-riding theme of distrust of government. As with most propaganda, there are small kernals of truth embedded in the story. However the big picture is a direct assault on reality.