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The Thirty-Year Genocide

Turkey's Destruction of Its Christian Minorities, 1894-1924
Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
Length: 21 hrs and 56 mins
Categories: History, European
4.5 out of 5 stars (11 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A reappraisal of the giant massacres perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire and then the Turkish Republic against their Christian minorities from 1894 to 1924

Between 1894 and 1924, three waves of violence swept across Anatolia, targeting the region's Christian minorities, who had previously accounted for 20 percent of the population. By 1924 the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks had been reduced to two percent. Most historians have treated these waves as distinct, isolated events, and successive Turkish governments presented them as an unfortunate sequence of accidents. The Thirty-Year Genocide is the first account to show that the three were actually part of a single, continuing, and intentional effort to wipe out Anatolia's Christian population. 

The years in question, the most violent in the recent history of the region, began during the reign of the Ottoman sultan Abdulhamid II, continued under the Young Turks, and ended during the first years of the Turkish Republic founded by Ataturk. Yet despite the dramatic swing from the Islamizing autocracy of the sultan to the secularizing republicanism of the post-World War I period, the nation's annihilationist policies were remarkably constant, with continual recourse to premeditated mass killing, homicidal deportation, forced conversion, mass rape, and brutal abduction. And one thing more was a constant: the rallying cry of jihad. While not justified under the teachings of Islam, the killing of two million Christians was effected through the calculated exhortation of the Turks to create a pure Muslim nation. 

Revelatory and impeccably researched, Benny Morris and Dror Ze'evi's account is certain to transform how we see one of modern history's most horrific events.

©2019 Benny Morris and Dror Ze'evi (P)2019 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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I’ve always wondered..

There isn’t much historical documentation on the Armenians of Turkey and what happened to them.
I know now and it’s worse than I could imagine.
If this would be taught in school about historical Muslim Genocide occurrences of non Muslims populations so a Caliphate could be created; we would not have been so shocked by the activities of ISIS.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Excellent and Exhaustive

This audiobook provides an authoritative account of the three decades of ethnic and religious violence that plagued Anatolia and surrounding areas. The authors present the best known Armenian genocide of 1915-16 in the context of large anti Christian violence against Greeks and Assyrians, and the earlier 1894-96 and later 1919-1923 mass killings, forced conversions, rapes, and delortations As the length and subject should make obvious, this narrative will not be a simple read/listen, and the grim subject matter can leave you glum or angry, since there are so many horrors described within. That point is not a criticism, but speaks to the talent of the reader and the thoroughness of the authors.

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Part of history needed to be told again.

This study of what happened to the Christians from 1894 to 1924 during the Ottomans empires last years, the young Turks and Ataturk, is remarkably in its detail, while at the same time revealing the devastating scope and horror of the Genocide.

Make no mistake this was a genocide, and one of the most devastating the World has seen.

The perpetrators were motivated primarily by religious fervor and secondarily by fear of loss of territory and desire for gain of property.

The perpetrators were predominantly Muslim Turks aided by then allied Kurds. The victims were Armenians, Assyrians and Greeks.

Obviously there were atrocities by the ultimate victims against the perpetrators, who would not want to defend themselves, but except for a misguided attempt by Greeks between 1919 and 1923 to gain territory in western Anatolia, Turkish attempts to blame others is completely unjustified. Even then, what Turks eventually did to the Greek population in Anatolia is not proportional to what Greeks did to Turks.

It is disturbing that Turkey not even today has accepted any responsibility for these 30 years of genocide against Christians. Contrary to the German genocide against primarily Jews during the Second World War, which Germany has accepted responsibility for, Turkey continue to deny any responsibility for events covered in this excellent book. This is completely unacceptable and by itself should prevent Turkey from being a member of international organizations like the EU.

By not accepting responsibility Turkey effectively is suggesting that the religious animosity and superiority feelings which resulted in these genocidal acts remain prevalent, and certainly the present day behavior of President Erdogan only confirms this.

This book is highly recommended and the authors deserves great appreciation for their 10 years of research into these horrible events.