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Publisher's Summary

The first book in the Galactic Empire series, the spectacular precursor to the classic Foundation series, by one of history’s most influential writers of science fiction, Isaac Asimov

His name was Biron Farrill and he was a student at the University of Earth. A native of one of the helpless Nebular Kingdoms, he saw his home world conquered and controlled by the planet Tyrann - a ruthless, barbaric Empire that was building a dynasty of cruelty and domination among the stars.

Farrill’s own father had been executed for trying to resist the Tyrann dictatorship and now someone was trying to kill Biron. But why?

His only hope for survival lay in fleeing Earth and joining the rebellion that was rumored to be forming somewhere in the Kingdoms. But once he cast his lot with the freedom fighters, he would find himself guarding against treachery on every side and facing the most difficult choice of all: to betray either the woman he loved or the revolution that was the last hope for the future.

©1951, 1986, 2009 Isaac Asimov (P)2020 Random House Audio

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What listeners say about The Stars, Like Dust

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good

I was a bit bored at first but kept on and enjoyed it. Definitely worth the read

5 people found this helpful

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good listin

good listin. love issac 's work. make sure you enjoy this listin. you will not be sorry.

3 people found this helpful

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A Great Literary Master

This is Asimov at his best. Here he introduces us to the beginnings of the 'Foundation Trilogy'. Though dated, it is his use of math, history and science that makes this a great title to tead.

2 people found this helpful

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perfect reading of a master writer.

perfect reading of a master writer declaring his goal of exploring the best form of human society.

2 people found this helpful

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Asimov delivers, like always

I freaking love Isaac Asimov. Like always, good twists and turns through space and logic.

2 people found this helpful

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Pervasive misogyny ruins an otherwise OK book

It's been a while since I read any Asimov stories. I've previously read several of the Robot stories and most of the Foundation stories, but it was quite a while ago.

The science fiction aspects of the story are fine, if a little dated (although given that the story was published in 1951, that's really to be expected). The plot is moderately interesting.

What killed the book for me was the portrayal of women and the language used to talk about women. Or, I should say woman, because there is only one female character. Her character is slightly more than one-dimensional in its depiction. But the way that she is referred to, both by other characters and by the narrator, is abysmally sexist.

The misogyny in this book makes me much less likely to read Asimov again.

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outdated concepts.

I love Isaac Asimov, but novels written in the 1950s struggle to keep up in 2021.

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Excellent storytelling and performance...

Another excellent read from Isaac Asimov. Well done, and a good performance, as well. Looking forward to the remainder of the series.

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He has done better.

Do not read the rest of my review if you have not read the book!

scarlet pimpernel? Really?
The Constitution? More really?

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Listen to this book

The fact that this was written in 1951 is insane. I started reading Asimov recently and I can not believe that I had not heard of him earlier. I would encourage everyone to read this book. Jon Lindstrom does a great job narrating. Asimov’ style involves deep, sophisticated dialog that takes place between characters at the most pivotal parts of the story, it is a tall task for a narrator. During a couple of those pivotal moments, the dialog of the characters blended together. It could have easily been my fault for not listening closely enough, and the solution was as simple as rewinding a minute or two. For that reason, I gave Lindstrom a 4/5. Seems a bit petty now that I’ve written it down.

Listen to the book.