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The Soldier

Windham, Book 2
Narrated by: James Langton
Series: Windham, Book 2
Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
4 out of 5 stars (282 ratings)
This title is included in Audible Escape

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This Story Is Seductive

Publisher's Summary

His idyllic estate is falling down from neglect, and nightmares of war give him no rest. Then Devlin St. Just meets his new neighbor....

With her confident manner hiding a devastating secret, his lovely neighbor commands all of his attention, and protecting Emmaline becomes Devlin's most urgent mission.

Contains mature themes.

©2011 Grace Burrowes (P)2016 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"Burrowes continues her winning streak with a delicious, sensual historical romance capturing the spirit of the time." ( Booklist)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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The Soldier

The story was great! , performance perfect, characters endearing, especially Winny. I could not stop listening.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Story of Two Wounded Souls

The Soldier is a beautiful tale of two wounded souls - St. Just suffers from PTSD and a feeling of never quite belonging to his family after his mother left him with the Duke and Duchess of Windham. Emmy is is not accepted by her neighbors and is trying to handle her young cousin Winnie, who has a tendency to wander off for long periods of time. Watching St Just and Emmy come to terms with their past and realize they are deserving of love was a wonderful experience. Grace Burrowes has a wonderful way of bringing emotional depth to her stories and showing the little things that show caring in a relationship. I look forward to Lord Val's story. I also just saw Tantor is picking up the rest of the Windham stories about the daughters later this year and I will be making sure to hoard credits so I can get them on release day.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • k
  • 05-06-19

Little too modern thinking

It’s a good story but feels a bit long. I like all the characters. This book is about PTSD and illegitimacy. I was able to predict the secrets each characters had to hide. IMHO, I think think this book had to much modern thinking/living. I doubt in that period, each characters able to get away with how they think and lives. Also, is there shampoo 🧴 in that period?😓.

It’s a happy ending type of story. So, if you like that stuff with a dash of steamy scenes, this one is for you. <— ok little or than a dash.😜

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Jessy
  • Idaho, USA
  • 05-01-19

I really want that apple tart recipe.

**Possible Spoiler Alerts**

I'm going to start with a positive. I loved seeing St. Just's character development and Burrows gives his history throughout the story. We get to see how close he and his family are with Valentine; they're such a touchy bunch, it's endearing and sweet.

However, I am not a fan of the female lead. She's immature, lacks some serious common sense, confidence, and internal reflection, and she's just an inconsiderate character. She can't see the pain she's causing the little girl, the vicar, the earl or anyone around her. It's always "I'm not good enough for her/him", "me, me, me" and "I know what's best..." and she's what...? 21 maybe 22 years old and never left her cottage/ make shift bakery????

Her obsession with society norms and "what's right" is juvenile at best. Her personal martyrdom is only tragic in that it touches so many people. Her conviction is blind, perilous, and oftentimes assaulting and the only one who "benefits" from her terrible choices are... no one. Not even her. I don't want to hang out with her, but I'll take her baked goods.

She uses these men for her (dis)advantage and, honestly, if St. Just hadn't gotten a boner at seeing her naked in the pond/ lake after 2 years, he probably wouldn't have been so infatuated with her to ignore her obvious personality flaws.

I really wanted St. Just to find someone else; he deserves someone who will put away their bullshit and grow the f- up. He deserves a woman, not some silly girl too guarded to be honest with herself and everyone around her. The reveal is too late in the book for any redemption and I shudder to think that if this were the real world St. Just's conclusion regarding their marriage (before her declaration of love) would be what happens. It's unfortunate that Burrows couldn't pull the conclusion up a little more in the story to give the heroine a little vindication. I notice that the first book was also very last minute and the heroine self-adsorbed as well. Not everything can be so wrapped up nicely, I guess.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Could have been more stars but...

James Langton can narrates the men voices very well but when it comes to the female characters, he is unbearable and it ruins the listen.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Great series but lesser entry

Grace Burrowes is one of my favorite writers. But- This is far from my favorite book of hers or my favorite Windham tale.
In this Windham entry, we learn a great deal about St.Just & his relationships with Val & other Windhams. Much is delightful & engaging, & characters are well drawn with excellent voice distinctions by James Langton as narrator.
St Just’s courtship of Emmy & her extended decision process, however, drags interminably with significant repetition. The end is overly predictable but not improved by an abrupt halt- as if the author met her quota of pages & simply stopped writing.

I would have preferred less angst from Emmy & a more carefully plotted ending. Not a book I’ll be rereading.

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simply lovely

loved this. wonderful characters. Emmy is a determined woman. St Just is perfect. The plot keeps your attention and you cheer these two people on.

I did not like the narrator's voice for St. Just who is supposed to be in his early 30s and a soldier. He sounded nasally and old.

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • N. Jain
  • Pleasanton, CA, US
  • 07-10-18

Disappointing heroine

I really liked the 1st book in the series. I was excited to hear this one but first I got bored with the story, then put it away and listed to a completely different novel and came back to finish this. The narration is ok- no Simon Prebble or Mary Jane Wells - but ok. The problem was that the story was so stupid. The heroine seemed whiny and seemed to drag out making a decision. She kept 2 good men on hooks. Not someone I admire in a person. I’m disappointed and wonder if I should listen to the third book. This was such a waste of my time and the only good thing about it is when it ended.

Wow- I’m not written such a review before.

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    2 out of 5 stars
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Absolutely Ridiculous

The effort to provide a 'mystery' in this book is pathetic. The characters can only be defined as idiots. What a waste of time.

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    3 out of 5 stars

Getting worse

This series started strong with interesting characters, somewhat different stories, and tolerable prose. There were a couple of annoying anachronisms (such as "coffee table," which didn't exist in homes until the late 19th century nor was it called such. Instead, a man put his feet up on a footstool."Fainting couches" also didn't exit. They had recamiers, sofas, window seats, and couches.), and vocabulary issues, but for the most part they weren't a problem.

By this book, however, these problems were so commonplace as to clearly demonstrate that Ms. Burrows simply hasn't done her homework. One should never mention or describe furniture from later periods in a Regency novel. Same goes for idioms and throwing in Latin based words in the middle of prosaic Anglo-Saxon conversation or inner thoughts, especially by women (e.g. "mendacious"). This sort of thing may seem trivial, but there are so many good Regency romances out there, the authors of which have clearly studied the period and know the vocabulary, decor, laws, etc. The upper classes also did not use contractions. They were considered vulgar.

One of the most egregious flaws is actually a pivot point of the story and that is legal guardianship of a child by a woman. There was no such thing during the Regency period. Fathers ALWAYS had all the rights over children, bi-blows or legitimate. Woman had none. Even heads of families could take children sired by a member of his family, however distant, away from their mothers.

What absolutely destroyed my interest in further books was Mr. Langton's characterization of Devlin St. Just. Despite the narrative both in this book and in "The Heir" making absolutely clear that Devlin spoke as if he were born to the nobility, Langton insists upon giving him an Irish brogue that sounds more like a Boston dock worker than a child brought up in a noble English family. Even if he sounded Irish when he was 6, by the time he was 16, he would have had a haughty, upper class accent. Even worse, the hero should never have an unpleasant timbre to his voice. All in all, the male voice characterizations are far less appropriate or even well defined as are the women. Pity she didn't keep Roger Hampton as narrator.

I'm also starting to get tired of whiny women with extreme inferiority complexes writing agendas for everyone else.

I will be returning any of Ms Burrows books that I haven't read. It's a pity as the first two novellas were very promising.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Thor
  • 03-19-19

History Repeating? I think not.

Devlin’s mother hands him over to his father the Duke, to give him a better life. As a young toddler he is traumatized by this desertion of his mother; who he never see again. Maybe a "noble gesture", but one his mother lives to regret.
The heroine's aunt bed her niece's young lover, so when the baby is born, people will assume it is hers. So the child has never known her real mother, but regards the heroine as a relative.
Along comes the Hero, heroine decides her daughter can have a better life as his ward. However unlike his mother she is not willing to make the transition easy, very much "Idon't want her but you can't have her" attitude.
Neither characters are appealing, he won't rape her, but will suduce her, knowing she wants none of it. She says no, but never puts up a fight, so climbing into the Hero's bed is still willing to marry the vicar. Who she knows has already survived a miserable marriage. She comes across as very selfish and spoilt, who is use to people cleaning up her mess. He come across as spineless one minute and abit of a bully in the next.
A very week story, no worth the effort .

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Profile Image for Ros H.
  • Ros H.
  • 04-22-19

Not bad

I enjoyed this book though I found there was just a bit too much gratuitous sex. The story line was good and loved the reader.
I did like the fact that this book ties in well with the previous in the series.