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Publisher's Summary

August Busch IV had everything - or seemed to. In 2006, Busch became the chief executive of Anheuser-Busch, the sixth member of his family to control the legendary brewery. At age 42, Busch was handsome, wealthy, married to a beautiful woman, and running one of the biggest companies in America. Two years later, Busch lost control of Anheuser-Busch. Soon he was jobless, divorced, and struggling with alcohol and drugs. Then he woke to find his girlfriend, a waitress named Adrienne Martin, dead in his bed.

From prize-winning novelist and former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson, The Prince of Beers is the true story of the secrets, lies, addiction, and family dysfunction behind Martin's death and Busch's shocking downfall.

©2013 Alex Berenson (P)2013 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

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Rise & Fall of the King of Beers


This was the story of August Busch, the Fourth as his nickname noted in the Busch beer dynasty. Groomed to take over from his father, the Third, August was never really up to the task. He has a great deal in common with Reggie Vanderbilt, a grandson of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, who gambled and partied away his inheritance. August was tainted by the deaths of two women he was entertaining at various times of his life. He blows the over 100 million from the sale to InBev on guns, drugs and cats among others.