Regular price: $14.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Prince is sometimes claimed to be one of the first works of modern philosophy, especially modern political philosophy, in which the effective truth is taken to be more important than any abstract ideal. It was also in direct conflict with the dominant Catholic and scholastic doctrines of the time concerning politics and ethics.

Although it is relatively short, the treatise is the most remembered of Machiavelli's works and the one most responsible for bringing the word "Machiavellian" into usage. It even contributed to the modern negative connotations of the words "politics" and "politician" in western countries.

In terms of subject matter it overlaps with the much longer Discourses on Livy, which was written a few years later. The descriptions within The Prince have the general theme of accepting that the aims of princes, such as glory and survival - can justify the use of immoral means.

Public Domain (P)2018 Combray Media

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    8
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A great work of Political Philosophy.

The Narrator of this work is so good that you feel compelled to listen to the entire book.

This is a classical work of Politics for a reason and it has had an enormous impact on a variety of Political thinkers.


This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Five Hundred years later and it is still relevant

The Prince is one of the best "How to" guides that has ever been written. It basically tells rulers how to control their populace, but what most people miss out on is that NM calls for them to mitigate their cruelty and suspend their sloth. Machiavelli had endured lazy rulers in his own city and knew firsthand that a ruler should be able to make decisions in a quick and timely manner. He loathed laziness or people who relied on chance to get out of situations (that were usually of their own doing). There are many reasons that this book is still so well known today is the brutal honesty in which he lays out the factors that are needed to rule. I think my favorite has always been his advice in that you cannot be neutral on a topic. You have to pick a side. The text's lifespan speaks for itself, and without a doubt is worth reading even if you do not agree with what is being said.

The real question comes down to what is new? And that would be the narration provided by Christopher Boozell. He does a really great job of providing the text in a matter of fact manner. His reading style is crisp, clear, and easy to understand. If a textbook came to life it would have his voice. He does a really great job, just imparting knowledge without adding emotion isn't easy, and he doesn't make it sound like he is just reading lines. He is really great here, and does the job in exactly the manner it is meant to be done. A total professional. Even though I did receive a promo code for this review it in no way influenced my considerations of the material, and honestly, inspired me to be more honest. In fact, getting a code generally makes me harsher as a reviewer as I am more often concerned what someone like Me will decide based on my review.

If this review helped, please press the YES below. Thank you immensely!!!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The Prince


Considered the first Modern, Machiavelli with practicality. A prolific work which shows the sinister workings of your fellow men. This is a reading for any remotely interested in philosophy or interested in a guide on how not to be virtuous.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • EP
  • Walnut Creek, CA United States
  • 08-13-18

Timeless Classic of Political Strategy

This book is one of the most important and influential works of political philosophy. Even though it was written in the 16th century, many of the principles described in the book are still applicable today. In this book, Machiavelli describes, with clear-eyed pragmatism, how people are able to obtain and hold power. Many people make the mistake of seeing situations and circumstances as they want to see them, instead of seeing them as they are; Machiavelli is someone who describes political circumstances as they are.

To get the most out of the book, it helps to have some knowledge of its historical context. There are lots of references to people, princes and regions of the time, for example.

This is the kind of book that you learn something new each time you read it, depending on your particulars when you read it.

My favorite parts:
* Governing though fear has its benefits, but its always best to retain the affection of your people by avoiding- as much as possible-those actions that are particularly odious to the masses (in Machiavelli's era, taking another man's women or property). When a prince is forced by circumstances to engage in acts that are likely to be despised, he ought to perform them quickly and all at once, so the people won't routinely associate their prince with such acts.

*Princes ought to surround themselves with a few trusted individuals who are extremely honest with their advice, but who will only offer advice when the prince asks. Princes should then reward those who are the most honest with the advice.

*At the end of the book, Machiavelli describes the ascent of a prince named Castruccio. This was my favorite part of the book, as it describes the many specific circumstances and decisions that led to Castruccios's rise to power.

As for the narration: this is the type of book that requires the narrator to deliver the material well. Some narrators "own" the material they are reading; you can hear it in their voice as they are read. To me, this narrator sounded as if he were either unfamiliar with the material, didn't understand the material, or had no emotional connection to the material. His tone sounded uninspired and there were multiple pauses and hesitations that didn't suit the passage.

I was provided this audiobook at no charge by the author, publisher and/or narrator in exchange for an unbiased review.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good book

Really enjoyed this book. Great listen. Narrator did a great job. Would recommend to friends.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Advice for Politicians

A careful and well read translation of Machiavelli's advice to the Medici rulers on how to be a good ruler. The situation was specific, the advice, sometimes a bit ironic and possibly tongue in cheek, but there are bits of wisdom that still apply today.
A must read for every student of history and political science.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

If You’re Really Into 16th Century Italy

In his own words Niccolo Machiavelli says in “The Prince” that “the present it more important than the past” and so he gives a fairly succinct review of his own work. Whatever it once had in contemporary names, locations and battles has been lost in the ensuing 400 years. Americans are poor at recalling their own history yet this work expects the listener to understand the facts and even subtleties of fifteenth and sixteenth century Europe. Not going to happen.

“The Prince” reeks of contradictions. Let me cite just one. Machiavelli says people should fear their leader and that, in order to be successful a good prince must exercise meanness. At this same time, however, he insists great leaders shouldn’t be hated. How’s that going to happen? Fear and meanness lead to respect and admiration? We see how well that’s working in 2018.

Christopher Boozell does a good job with the narration despite some irksome mispronunciations that should have been caught by the producer or editor.

In the end I firmly believe Machiavelli just doesn’t understand leaders, followers, or both and I’m at a loss to explain why this work is so revered. It was required reading when I was in college. I didn’t get it then and I don’t get it now.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic book!

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

This is an excellent reading of Machiavelli. The literature speaks for itself, but the narration sets this version apart -- clear, well-enunciated reading that lets you absorb the impact of the work.

As to The Prince itself, what can be said that hasn't been said? It's a pillar of Western culture for a reason, and an absolutely brilliant work of literature.