The Partition of Ireland and the Troubles: The History of Northern Ireland from the Irish Civil War to the Good Friday Agreement

Narrated by: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 50 mins
Categories: History, Europe
4 out of 5 stars (41 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

“The Honorable Member must remember that in the South they boasted of a Catholic State. They still boast of Southern Ireland being a Catholic State. All I boast of is that we are a Protestant Parliament and a Protestant State. It would be rather interesting for historians of the future to compare a Catholic State launched in the South with a Protestant State launched in the North and to see which gets on the better and prospers the more.” (Sir James Craig)

One of the most bitter and divisive struggles in the history of the British Isles, and in the history of the British Empire, played out over the question of Home Rule and Irish independence, and then later still as the British province of Northern Ireland grappled within itself for the right to secede from the United Kingdom or the right to remain.

What is it within this complicated relationship that has kept this strange duality of mutual love and hate at play? A rendition of “Danny Boy” has the power to reduce both Irishmen and Englishmen to tears, and yet they have torn at one another in a violent conflict that can be traced to the very dawn of their contact.

This history of the British Isles themselves is in part responsible. The fraternal difficulties of two neighbors so closely aligned, but so unequally endowed, can be blamed for much of the trouble. The imperialist tendencies of the English themselves, tendencies that created an empire that embodied the best and worst of humanity, alienated them from not only the Irish, but the Scots and Welsh too. However, the British also extended that colonial duality to other great societies of the world, India not least among them, without the same enduring suspicion and hostility. There is certainly something much more than the sum of its parts in this curious combination of love and loathing that characterizes the Anglo-Irish relationship.

The Partition of Ireland and the Troubles: The History of Northern Ireland from the Irish Civil War to the Good Friday Agreement analyzes the tumultuous events that marked the creation of Northern Ireland, and the conflicts fueled by the partition. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Northern Ireland like never before.

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors
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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

The Partition and the Troubles, slightly biased

This is a good, not great, brief look at the conflict in Northern Ireland, from a slightly British or Ulster POV. The author does a decent job discussing personalities and slight ideological differences in different Northern Irish leaders and skirts across many of the incidents, including a fair look at motivations on both sides. What is largely missing, however, is Ulster violence. I would call it a good introduction but it is too biased to be the first thing one hears about the issue.

3 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

A Good Overview

This is a good overview that hits all the big events and people: DeValera, Michael Collins, the Battle of the Bogside, etc.

2 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Tough Topic, Stiff British Accent

This was a brief summary that highlighted major negotiations and included an overview of the influence of American Presidents with Irish family history. The fight for freedom in Ireland is a sensitive, and the country is sincere about its history. Something about hearing it performed in the stiffness of a British accent did not sit in my ear well. I plan to find the book in a local library and try to read it the old fashioned way.

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  • Ky
  • 02-12-20

Very Good

Insightful and concise, sheds much light on the motivations of various factions in a complicated situation. Only critique would be to find a narrator who can properly pronounce Irish pace names.

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Narrated without paused or emotion - mind numbing

While the facts in the book are good, and need to be told, the narrator rushes through the reading with a monotone that is mind numbing. There is no inflection, and every sentence runs into the next - read like the longest run-on-sentence in history
If you want to purchase something to put you to sleep, this will do it. Just don’t know play while driving or you might fall asleep at the wheel.

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interesting

Good short history of The Troubles. I was amused and bemused at it being read by a very proper BBC English Male with some appalling wrong pronunciations of place names. i listened to in during a single road trip of 3 hours or so.

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  • bodo
  • 01-19-20

It's OK to start but also not completely true

There is nothing majorally incorrect but a lot of the nuance around the partition seems missing. there is nothing about Edward Carson for example. Also Irish words and place names are incorrectly pronounced

3 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Amazon Customer
  • 07-12-19

Horribly biased with terrible narration

Difficult to listen to. Narration sounds like a computer. Biased beyond belief or truth. Could not recommend.

2 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • DRodgers
  • 01-23-20

Needs an editor

Disrespectful of the facts. Norman Tebbit at this moment is alive and well, not one of the victims of the Brighton bomb, although his wife was badly injured. The Omagh bombing was carried out by a group calling itself the Real Irish Republican Army. It was not the IRA. So the fact checking is really not up to scratch. The pronunciation of many words needs to be corrected.

1 person found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Jenny Penny
  • 12-16-19

Dreadful reading. Literally can’t even pronounce “Sligo” correctly

The performer of this story has no clue how to pronounce even the simplest of Irish names. A book about Irish politics and he can’t even pronounce Taoiseach or Dáil Éireann correctly.

1 person found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Mr D.
  • 10-25-19

Wrong on Tebbit

The author claims that Norman Tebbit died in the 1984 Grand Hotel explosion. He didn’t. I saw him the other day.

1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Lloyd Houston
  • 09-16-19

Brisk, Informative, and Even-handed

An engaging and informative overview that does justice to all sides of the conflict. Just be prepared for every Irish place name to be aggressively mispronounced...

1 person found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Marie B.
  • 04-04-20

Rather superficial and tendentious

The coverage is rather superficial and opinionated, rather than presenting evidence, the pronunciation of Irish place names, political party names, including counties in Northern Ireland is really terrible and the reading is rather robotic. I would not recommend it.

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  • Alan Smith
  • 01-20-20

Inaccurate

Norman Tebbit was not killed in Brighton bombing his wife was injured so not correct.

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Anonymous User
  • 08-12-19

Awful narration

Unlistenable. Didn't get passed the into- sorry. Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable Unlistenable