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The Modern Scholar

Monsters, Gods, and Heroes: Approaching the Epic in Literature
Narrated by: Timothy Shutt
Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
Categories: Classics, Greek & Roman
4 out of 5 stars (55 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

From the very outset in the West - from the time of Homer himself in about 750 BCE - the epic has been the most highly regarded of literary genres. It is rivaled only by tragedy, which arose a bit more than two centuries later, as the most respected, the most influential, and, from a slightly different vantage point, the most prestigious mode of addressing the human condition in literary terms. The major epics are the big boys, the works that, from the very outset, everyone had heard of and everyone knew, at least by reputation. They are the works that had the most profound and most enduring cultural influence. And they are very much with us still, some more than others, but all - or all the most successful ones - are more or less firmly enshrined in cultural memory. They are still read. They are still taught. They still gain imitators and admirers. The stories they tell still shape our imagination and aspirations.
©2004 Timothy Shutt (P)2004 Recorded Books

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  • amar
  • bushkill, PA, United States
  • 06-15-12

Insightful even if you've read the books

What made the experience of listening to The Modern Scholar the most enjoyable?

I have read all the books he is talking about and have been doing a lot of studying on literary theory. He hits on most of tjose points and brings up several good ones that I havent heard before.

What does the narrator bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

A deeper analysis on the meaning of the texts.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

8 Hrs is a long tkme to sit in one sitting.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful